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The essentials

May 15, 2010 at 12:47 AM

Wow!

So I bought an Electric Keyboard for around $50. I have to say this has been one of my best purchases ever...

This is the first time I have ever practiced playing with a keyboard. It has become apart of my Daily Violin practice now. Before I even touch the violin, I warm up my pitch by playing a few intervals, and I hum along with them ... Then afterwards, I go and imagine (and hum) the next interval I am going to play and then hit the note to see if I was accurate.

Now I have come to pass one of my biggest regrets - not getting this thing earlier! It has made such a big difference, I'm starting to wish out of the options I had in high school I picked the Keyboard instead of the Guitar!

Now that I have something to match my intonation with, I can hear it perfectly (And my intonation on the new violin is back in shape :)). I am starting to realise that all the notes sound the same no matter what octave they are. I even find I am starting to put a name to a few notes I hear. Of course now its a matter of training my fingers ... 2nd position is a bit off on the G-D strings

Though, now I am finding it hard to draw a good tone out of the new instrument ... now to mess with sounding nice! That is the life long struggle.

If you don't have an electric keyboard

GO AND BUY ONE ALREADY!

Or atleast try it out :)


From Anne-Marie Proulx
Posted on May 15, 2010 at 4:01 AM

This is so true... I actually had one since day one and practised with it because I did ear training, harmony and theory lessons (and you need one for this!)

Of course, it helps a lot and I bet any violin solosist has at least an electronical piano near his/her practice room! (Also many violin "prodigies" have pianist mom that surely show them how to use the piano as a practice tool... I suspect ; )

Have a nice day!

Anne-Marie


From Reynard Hilman
Posted on May 15, 2010 at 5:02 AM

ha $50 keyboard is a good deal. did michael tell you to buy one? 

once you play long enough you'll develop a grid in your mind so when you play out of tune, your hand will snap to the grid :) I think that's what good violinists do, they don't always land in tune perfectly but they have "snap to grid" enabled. 


From Dimitri Adamou
Posted on May 16, 2010 at 9:44 PM

I've been meaning to buy a keyboard for a very long time ... since I also have a full time job I had some money on the side and thought why not ~ so I went to eBay and bought one from there.

Its been very useful, also have been humming intervals and figuring out pieces by ear. I have the grid in my head already - but now its more so similar to toning up exercises (weight-training); after building all that muscle you have to tone it up for 'fine-tuning' purposes (whatever they may be) - so with the keyboard I am fine-tuning the grid

@Anne-Marie Of course :) Haha you had the right idea from the start!

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