FLASHY violinists. And who are your favorites?

Edited: December 18, 2017, 11:30 PM ·


A violin is a fiddle that went to university - but the fiddle earns more money.


Máiréad Nesbitt
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jNuyYUTNKFg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z-ttrQ38mOc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Xmg0uVsPpk


Replies (59)

Edited: December 18, 2017, 11:36 PM ·


Ashley MacIsaac
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0B2SnKk-m6g

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pEERrm_CFMY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yZATsdbrGDE

Edited: December 18, 2017, 11:21 PM · Máiréad Nesbitt, your first video link, at 0:19 said, "I first picked the violin when I was six, A BIT OF A LATE STARTER ACTUALLY..."

OH MY GOSH. Someone started at 6 and still thinks it was late??? In all honesty I hope she was only kidding ...

BTW, I happened to know Janine Jansen started at 6. I guess there can be other famous performers who started at 6 or older?

December 18, 2017, 11:23 PM ·

Cora Smith (with M. Nesbitt)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmHZV161nCs

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ywMPtwM8avs

Edited: December 19, 2017, 12:10 AM ·

Originally posted by Will Willy
Edited: December 18, 2017, 11:21 PM

"Máiréad Nesbitt, your first video link, at 0:19 said, "I first picked the violin when I was six, A BIT OF A LATE STARTER ACTUALLY..."
OH MY GOSH. Someone started at 6 and still thinks it was late??? In all honesty I hope she was only kidding ..."

Hi Will,

Boyo, she wasn't kidding, at all, lad.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NOG0K3HzRgg


Thanks for the comment.
Robbie


December 19, 2017, 12:01 AM ·


Eddie South.


I LOVE the riff at 2:42 where he plucks the string. Very cheeky.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uXWjQKXq0Mw

I first heard this when i was 17 or 18.

December 19, 2017, 12:07 AM ·

Micheal Warlop
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HncM-vKZLuQ

December 19, 2017, 12:09 AM ·

Stephane Grappelli
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mpP_aD0K7HE

December 19, 2017, 1:36 AM · Who seriously thinks 6 is a late start? Surely she was joking?
December 19, 2017, 3:58 AM · Speaking of late, I did find it hard to believe starting at 6 is late.

A year ago I did have the same surprise when accidentally watching a youtube video of a viola professor from Sydney conservatorium of music, who basically said he was an outlier since he started his viola at 10, which in his words is 'quite late for string players'. (video below, 0:35)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFoc8vdLtUo&t=16s

I found it hard to believe that one must start from that young age to become really good.

Now this young lady said she was late when she started at 6. OH MY GOD.

Edited: December 19, 2017, 6:54 AM · Wow this thread is great. I had no idea there were violinists on youtube.
December 19, 2017, 10:37 AM · Hmmm...I guess waiting until age 61 to start was not a good career move. Oh well, c'est la vie
Edited: December 19, 2017, 11:01 AM ·

Hi Christopher

Maybe not a good career move, UNLESS you have a gift.

But learning a new instrument in our golden years is very good for the brain and helps to prevent dementia. So, good for you, and keep at it.
Try mandolin next, it has the same tuning as a violin.
Or if want, google search "images of mandolin chords" and LIGHTLY play your violin like a mandolin, or just bow the chords.
I am 56 and am going to get much more serious about playing with my new electric violin because it's MUCH quieter than my acoustic is. I've always felt very self-conscious when playing the acoustic because...well...neighbors don't appreciate someone learning the violin.
I, now, try all sorts of new things on my electric and it's barely heard. I feel much beter about it all, now.

Robbie


Edited: December 19, 2017, 11:15 AM ·

Natalie MacMaster with her 4 oldest children (ages 7, 6, 4 and 2) at the Dublin Irish Festival, August 4, 2013.

At 3:37 on the timer , mom, son and daughter play the traditional-Irish The Leaving of Liverpool.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vh9i6vf0TlU


December 19, 2017, 11:26 AM ·


Natalie MacMaster
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZdHR12lPcgI

December 19, 2017, 1:03 PM · Age 10 is a late start for a professional string player.
December 19, 2017, 1:45 PM · Nowadays, due to high competition for orchestra positions, it's best to start playing before you are conceived. I heard about someone who waited until they were born to start playing, and because of their late start they were never able to become a professional.
Edited: December 19, 2017, 2:01 PM · I think Mozart and other child prodigies did begin before they were born, probably in a prior (though not necessarily immediately previous) incarnation. Thus, it's never too late in life to begin violin. And with respect to the OP's question, what about Rubinoff? I saw him play at my public school many years ago on his $100,000 Stadivari violin. I think he fits into the "flashy" category. You can see him play in a couple of old films from the 1930s - I think one had Eddy Cantor in it.
December 19, 2017, 2:27 PM · Now I understand that starting at 10 for a string instrument is considered quite late.

But is starting at 6 also *kind of* late, as has been claimed by the lady above?

FWIW, I read that Janine Jansen began playing at 6, per Wikipedia.

Edited: December 19, 2017, 3:38 PM ·


Hi John and Will,

John,
A movie title would be great. I'd like to see and hear Mr Rubinoff play.
I don't think i've ever heard his name before.
(Shame on me).
EDIT:
Actually, John, i did a QUICK search and found this information.
"David Rubinoff, who appeared in the vast, vast majority of his films (and there were many) and radio appearances (of which there were hundreds) billed simply as Rubinoff(and his Violin),and most film goers and radio listeners of the time never knew he had a first name, or thought "and His Violin" was his last name, is performing here in a night club setting. As the plays the violin, guests at tables ask him questions, such as "Are you married?", etc. He answers them by playing certain selections on his fiddle. Since the songs include "Fiddlin on the Fiddle", "Give Me a Moment Please", "When Day is Done" and "Dark Eyes", the questions had to be somewhat contrived. Claire James ( as Clair James,fresh from her 1938 runnerup in the Miss America pageant in Atlantic City) sings a song, June Hart and Jack Holland (III) dance to one, as also does the team of Collette & Barry. "Footage from this short was later incorporated into a 1946 "Melody Masters" called "Headline Bands", and this short itself was reissued by Warners on January 3, 1948."
EDIT:
No, i do recall, now, seeing one movie and hearing the name "Rubinoff and His Violin" - i remember THAT part of his name.
--------------------------------------------------

Will,
Speaking of names.
The lady's names is, Máiréad Nesbitt.
Margaret = Máiréad in Irish.
---------------------------------------------------

To all,
I am little surprised that a few violinist, here, can't imagine a very young child learning violin.
Look at the different scale-sizes in which violins are available. Why would that be?

Nobody has even commented on Natalie MacMaster's children playing violin, above? What!???


Thanks for the comments and suggestions.
Robbie


Edited: December 20, 2017, 7:45 AM ·

Hi all,

And why hasn't any violinist mentioned this guy on the second to last day until the end of Chanukah?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PseBnzX4Re8

Robbie

Edited: December 19, 2017, 3:33 PM ·


Hi John,

Check THIS out.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ke7TYEVUGvU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TUqnv4ijh5g

He was awesome.

Thanks for his name.

Robbie

December 20, 2017, 1:24 AM · When I would like to introduce less known (not jus absolutely favourites of mine from classic (Menuhin, Stern ...) and contemporary (Hilary Hahn, Daniel Hope - love his Guarneri sound.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVtIl3dqDbM
this is great song, and I love violin guy from Bester quartet (former Cracow klezmer band)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3nsn4f_kWAk

December 21, 2017, 6:30 PM · The late Sir Malcolm Sargent appears not to have been involved with violinists.
December 22, 2017, 8:36 AM · WOW Eddie South is epic!!!! It's my pick: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=djAKqDUqMzU
December 22, 2017, 9:03 AM · I cannot possibly answer the question. Let's just say that I prefer not to look in a mirror when I'm playing ;)
December 23, 2017, 3:58 PM · Perhaps the most entertaining version of Gypsy bravura is Josef Lendavy:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L3fYZDqb7qw

Edited: December 27, 2017, 9:00 PM ·


Hi Cat,

The video clip you showed is not of Eddie South. Eddie died in 1962.

Here is a clip of Eddie South.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mJ5T9NpmWng

Eddie South
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eddie_South

Robbie

December 25, 2017, 6:20 PM · Alexander Markov is flashiest of all.
December 25, 2017, 6:29 PM · Six, a late start? Ridiculous.

Lol I actually know someone who's a serious ballet dancer, and her mother played Tchaikovsky ballet music while pregnant in the hopes that the baby would learn it before being born!

December 26, 2017, 2:01 PM · Gemma, yes, as a layman I don't think six years old is a late start (but it may not be an extremely early start either? I don't know), and I'm gonna hold this opinion until someone corrects me.

Janine Jansen and Gil Shaham started at age 6 and 7 AFAIK.

P/S The young lady claiming six as the late start (in the video) didn't wish to discourage anyone I believe :) She may be just talking about herself.

Edited: December 27, 2017, 8:51 AM · Charles Willett wrote: Alexander Markov is flashiest of all.

Agreed. I still find his Paganini Caprices amazing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CPVUfcQe9og

December 27, 2017, 11:38 AM ·


Hi all,

All amazing are these entries.

My ears really like Alexander Markov and David Rubinoff.
At present, i am halfway through the Markov performance which was posted here and all i can think is that the violin is truly an amazing instrument and the composers of centuries ago were just as amazing.

Robbie

December 27, 2017, 2:17 PM · Six would not be "extremely" early, but anyone who calls it "late" is making excuses for their lack of talent/the fact that they didn't work hard as a young person. You'll find most symphony members & many soloists started around that age or later. No one seems to be discouraged, it's just worth pointing out in case anyone gets the wrong idea and further spreads that falsehood.

To get back to OP's question, while it's a bit of a faux pas to admit this, I actually admire what Andre Rieu has done, making classical music accessible & fun for everyone. Certainly a good example of "the fiddler makes more money", not to say he's a bad violinist, but those types of performers are making a lot more than soloists these days.


Edited: December 28, 2017, 6:58 AM · Gemma, no faux pas there! Andre Rieu comes from a musical family in Holland, started learning the violin at age 5, and graduated with the "Premier Prix" at the Royal Conservatory in Brussels. He is a solid professional who saw what he wanted to do, made it happen, and has been doing it successfully ever since.

I suppose I should declare an interest - I have relatives and extended family in Belgium.

December 27, 2017, 3:18 PM · That's true, mainly said faux pas because people tend to get very judgy when it comes to him for some reason :)
December 27, 2017, 4:50 PM · *people tend to get very judgy when it comes to him for some reason*

IMO because
1. They think better soloists should've earned more money;
2. They fear some layman audience would construe him to be the best classical violinist, given his fame.

People would become more judgmental when it comes to Lindsey Stirling.

But she is also good and successful in the specific things that she does ... So what not to like?

*anyone who calls it "late" is making excuses for their lack of talent/the fact that they didn't work hard as a young person.*

It would be unfair to immediately label 'anyone' having this kind of opinion this way, given there is such diverse opinion on this issue. What if she really thinks six is a late start for her; what if she was convinced that she started later than what is considered average for whatever professional goals she might have.

Though personally rejecting the idea that six was 'generally' a late start for whatever purpose one may have with the violin, I don't blame anyone spreading that 'falsehood' either.

I apologize to the OP for having started an irrelevant discussion. This is my last comment on the topic, as we have had such lengthy discussion on age on other threads.

December 27, 2017, 5:19 PM · Yeah, I mean both of those things are completely true, there's just no reason to be snobby (not you - others are). Same with Lindsey. These people understand that money is in originality.

Edited: December 27, 2017, 7:08 PM ·

----------------------------------------------------------
Originally posted by Will Willy
December 27, 2017, 4:50 PM
"...I apologize to the OP for having started an irrelevant discussion. This is my last comment on the topic, as we have had such lengthy discussion on age on other threads."
----------------------------------------------------------

Hi Will,

No worries.
It was, after all, Miss Nesbitt, herself, who, sort of, started this conversation when she said that she "...was a bit of a late starter" at 6.

I am rather enjoying this conversation, while at the same time, being introduced to great violinists as we go along.

I just wonder why nobody has mentioned Natalie MacMaster's 6 and 7-year-old children playing violin in front of a large crowd in this video which i had posted earlier.

I was looking at her 6-year-old son playing with his chin NOT on the chin rest.
I was admiring her daughter's ability to look at the two sets of hands adjusting her mic while she played on, not missing a beat.
These kids must have started fiddling pretty young - which would illustrate Miss Nesbitt's comment about herself "being a bit of a late starter" at 6.
It seems in Irish families, they do start out quite young.

Watch as mom, son and daughter play The Leaving Of Liverpool, together, and then the 4-year-old, and 2-year-old, dancing with the others.

If you'll notice, the son puts his hand on the shoulder of his 4-year-old sister to stop her from dancing so the 2-year-old has her lime light.
And THEN, lol, how the little one knows exactly when to raise her hands in the air for the finalé.
Show biz family.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vh9i6vf0TlU

Thank you,
Robbie

Edited: December 27, 2017, 7:28 PM ·


----------------------------------------------------------
Originally posted by Gemma K
December 27, 2017, 2:17 PM

"...anyone who calls it "late" is making excuses for their lack of talent/the fact that they didn't work hard as a young person...."
----------------------------------------------------------

Hi Gemma,

Miss Nesbitt did say that she was playing piano before the violin.

She, also, has gone to university to study classical violin, has a long list of musical accomplishments, and now, composes original music.

"...lack of talent"?

Thanks,
Robbie

December 27, 2017, 7:35 PM · I'm genuinely sorry if I offended Miss Nesbitt, and honestly, didn't look into her musical accomplishment at all.

I hold to my word that that is true for the most part, but obviously for her that is not the case. There are of course exceptions to the rule.

Edited: December 27, 2017, 8:28 PM ·

Hi Gemma,

You can go to the first post in this thread to hear her short interview.
It's the first video.

Thanks
Robbie

December 28, 2017, 7:15 AM · You can see David Rubinoff playing in the first couple of minutes of this link, before the Betty Boop cartoon starts. Nothing flashy in his playing there!

https://archive.org/details/bb_morning_noon_and_night

December 28, 2017, 11:54 AM · That Betty Boop cartoon is pretty amazing. I dislike the misuse of "surreal" but there's a pretty dreamlike quality to some of those images. And Rubinoff isn't bad either.
Edited: December 28, 2017, 7:59 PM ·

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Originally posted by Robbie Daug
Edited: December 19, 2017, 3:33 PM ·

Hi John,

Check THIS out.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ke7TYEVUGvU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TUqnv4ijh5g

He was awesome.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Originally posted Robbie Daug
Edited on December 19, 2017, 3:38 PM ·

"David Rubinoff, who appeared in the vast, vast majority of his films (and there were many) and radio appearances (of which there were hundreds) billed simply as Rubinoff(and his Violin),and most film goers and radio listeners of the time never knew he had a first name, or thought "and His Violin" was his last name, is performing here in a night club setting. As the plays the violin, guests at tables ask him questions, such as "Are you married?", etc. He answers them by playing certain selections on his fiddle. Since the songs include "Fiddlin on the Fiddle", "Give Me a Moment Please", "When Day is Done" and "Dark Eyes", the questions had to be somewhat contrived. Claire James ( as Clair James,fresh from her 1938 runnerup in the Miss America pageant in Atlantic City) sings a song, June Hart and Jack Holland (III) dance to one, as also does the team of Collette & Barry. "Footage from this short was later incorporated into a 1946 "Melody Masters" called "Headline Bands", and this short itself was reissued by Warners on January 3, 1948."
--------------------------------------------------

Hi John,

I don't know if you saw these already but i'm reposting them again

Thanks for his name,
Robbie

December 29, 2017, 1:46 AM · Hi Robbie, As I mentioned above, Rubinoff played at our school sometime in the 1950s. He played two concerts. One was a school assembly, and the other was a public concert; I went to both, the first live violin concerts I'd ever seen, and I was pretty impressed. There is some info about him on the net. Giving free concerts at schools was one of the things he did back then to promote music education. He also played at Jackson Prison, about 20 miles from here in about 1954. That may have been when I saw him at my school. I'd have been about seven then. His distinctive programs, shaped like a violin can still be found on ebay, if you're really becoming an enthusiast and want to purchase one. My cousins from Indiana remembered him playing at their school, too. I read somewhere that he had two good copies of his Stradivari made and his widow sold them after he died. His Strad itself, I read someplace, had belonged to a Parisian "courtesan" before he acquired it. At least it makes a good story.
Edited: December 29, 2017, 9:26 AM · Here's a couple.

https://youtu.be/vi1JeWrIPeA

https://youtu.be/0TvngLPRKcA

Edited: January 2, 2018, 11:29 AM · Maybe I'm old-fashioned (....maybe?), but I'm still a fan of the un-flashy. To me, the stage demeanor of the greats (my personal favorite is Zino Francescatti) is classic and classy. They don't make a visual spectacle get in the way of focusing on the music. And age, like any other such factor, can certainly be a two-edged sword.
Happy New Year.
Cheers,
Sandy
Edited: January 2, 2018, 7:43 PM · How about Joe Venuti? I’m not sure if what he does toward the end of this clip playing all four strings with a loosened bow can be considered “flashy”, but it’s still pretty neat. https://youtu.be/o5_JNdCxDv0
January 2, 2018, 8:41 PM · I'm pretty sure if most people here had to pick one, they'd choose non-flashy, myself included.
January 2, 2018, 9:16 PM · I like Andrew Manze for all his superb renditions of baroque violin music!
January 2, 2018, 11:52 PM · David Garrett
Vanessa Mae
Both of them were once top classical soloists and prodigies. Now both do lots of cross-over outside classical music. Not sure whether these two fit the definition of flashy :)) Some examples,

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WtDJuQ9oawU
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=euOu89d3npA
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bZ_BoOlAXyk

Edited: January 3, 2018, 3:48 AM · Without any doubt: Ara Malikian.
He plays Paganini, Flamenco and Led Zeppelin in the same concert. He has the talent of one of the best violinist and the flair of a Metal guitar player.

Very often "over the top" (as in the video below), but when he gets serious, such as with some composers and with Middle East or Flamenco music, he brings a lot of emotion to his playing.

January 3, 2018, 10:54 AM · Talk about a stormy summer,,, it was a twister!!!
Edited: January 3, 2018, 6:14 PM ·


Hi Carlos,

Wow!! That's some performance that Ara Malikian did.

Let's hope Tim doesn't see that or else he'll have a conniption fit, for sure lol.

Thanks,
Robbie

January 3, 2018, 6:55 PM · Paganini, even though he was influenced by other "flashy" violinists of his youth. I may be wrong, of course, having never heard/seen him live, but I suspect he was not a "boring" performer (think how he inspired a young Liszt, who was already a virtuoso/"flashy" pianist, to perfect his art.)

I do not know enough music to add contemporary violinists that are not Classical-I honestly and quite humbly mean it.

(I personally love "flashy" music and performers, when taken to mean challenging virtuoso showpieces. Not every work played at a concert/recital should be, IMHO, a superbly crafted work of "unlimited musical depth". Fun works are fun-they are often frowned upon by the more "musical ears" out there, however.)

In the end, love what you love-nothing wrong with that.

Edited: January 3, 2018, 7:02 PM · Here he is again, playing/dancing with Sara Baras. One of the most prized Flamenco dancers.
Edited: January 4, 2018, 9:33 AM ·


Hi Will,

Thanks for those suggestions.
Vanessa sure has a nice...uhm...smile. She's selling more than violin music, that's for sure. She reminds me of Lindsey Stirling for the sex appeal. I am okay with that.
Certain parts of that video reminded me of Waveya (the Vietnamese dance troupe on youtube). Gotta love Waveya - my favorite is Miu, by the way - she has a nice smile, too.

We can see many sexy female violinists appearing on those (Country's) Got Talent shows.

I remember Lettice Rowbotham
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TUOj_23EJWk

Analiza Ching
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u-P5TSMNTe4

Sue Son
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pRgq5p_NjPs
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e93Z-1HlbJA

Escala
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S3Gvxgudm4U

David Garrett is no Vanessa Mae but maybe the women would disagree.

I really like the video when he steps on the pedals to reproduce himself until he, sort of, creates a David Garrett Violin Ensemble - brilliant visual.

Thanks,
Robbie

Edited: January 3, 2018, 9:05 PM ·


Hi Adalberto,

Today, i watched a documentary about Paganini.
He was described as very awkward in his own skin in how he moved, like, not very graceful.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GRnA2IT1V8w

Having heard his Caprices played by Markov, i have no doubt that he was the FLASHIEST violinist of all time.

Thanks,
Robbie

January 4, 2018, 3:20 PM · Vanessa Mae...wow, looks like she'd be a great girlfriend! But the video itself seems created mostly to get just that kind of reaction, and the actual aesthetics of her rendition of Bach's Toccata & Fugue are...well, pretty cheesy, however flashy is her playing and her wearing of a dress.

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