Is this guy really good?....and other questions.

Edited: December 31, 2017, 6:59 AM ·
Hi all,

This is my second thread.
Last summer, i saw this violinist playing viola on the street.

I listened for a few minutes and then pulled out my video camera to record him because i was really liking what i was hearing.

In this 9-minute video which i have only uploaded to my Facebook page, he starts playing a piece at 4:25 on the time counter which i found quite amazing.
His name is Ezra Azmon.

I am wondering if anyone can identify the piece he's playing beginning at 4:25.
I would like to hear another version of it played by somebody else for comparison.

(video has been deleted by me, the OP)

He seems to be playing a couple of different pieces.
He told my friend and i they are all by Bach. I am not sure which Bach he meant, though.

Other questions that i would like to ask the forum about are the following:
- Is this man a REALLY good player?

- Any comments on his technique?

- What are all the titles of various pieces he's playing, here?

- And which Bach wrote these piece?

- Does anyone know where i can hear other people playing these pieces, on youtube?

Thanks for reading, listening, answering and for any comments offered.
Robbie

Replies (51)

December 12, 2017, 7:30 PM · From around 1:20 on, it sounds like he's playing J.S. Bach's Sonata No. 1 in G minor for unaccompanied violin, but tuned down a fifth for the viola. Here's Itzhak Perlman's recording: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lpDaLZsZS4c
December 12, 2017, 7:32 PM · J.S. Bach; the first piece is the Gigue from the cello suite no. 3 in C major, BWV 1009, but the second and third pieces are the Adagio and Fugue from the Bach g minor violin sonata, BWV 1001, played down a fifth on viola.

The cello suites are commonly performed on viola but it's unusual to hear one of the violin sonatas played down a fifth.

You can find many, many, many performances of all of those movements on youtube. Just do a search on the BWV number if you don't want to type out the titles.

He's a good player, but the only unusual thing about his playing is that it's much better than the average busker.

Edited: December 12, 2017, 7:53 PM · That guy is not self-taught. He grew up in Israel and studied the violin seriously in his childhood with the aim of becoming a soloist, but things in his life did not go his way, so he became a busker and found that he could make good money at it. I don't know about y'all but I can't walk past someone like that without dropping at least a fiver into his case. Even the jangly bluegrass violinists get a couple of bucks. I love buskers.
Edited: December 12, 2017, 7:55 PM · I was thinking he must have been a violinist. His playing of the g minor sonata (c minor on viola, I guess) was violinistic, not at all viola-like.

I'd drop more than a five-spot in his case.

Edited: December 18, 2017, 9:17 AM ·

Hi Evan and Marie-Ellen,

Thank you for the title info and links and suggestions to finding other links.
Very nice of you.

Mary-Ellen, i thought he was awesome.

I was on my bike passing by and his playing stopped me dead in my tracks. I felt compelled to stop and listen and then to record.

That's my grey bicycle parked on his left.

Ezra has many videos on YouTube from people who stopped to record him.

Thanks
Robbie

December 12, 2017, 8:00 PM · He's very good, don't get me wrong. But there are a lot of people who can play those pieces very well. What's different about him is that he's out on the street doing it.

Here is an article about him: http://www.cbc.ca/radio/docproject/features/from-soloist-to-busker-why-ezra-azmon-chooses-to-play-on-the-streets-1.4316592/from-soloist-to-busker-why-ezra-azmon-chooses-to-play-on-the-streets-1.4347816

To me the saddest part of the article is the comment that he "sometimes struggled under pressure." I don't want to derail this thread, but I'm sure I'm not the only musician who wondered if he'd tried some of the strategies for performance anxiety that have led to heated discussions on other threads.

December 12, 2017, 8:05 PM · By the way, Robbie, if someone says "Bach" they basically always mean J. S. Bach. The others have to be identified, as in "C. P. E. Bach," etc...
Edited: December 12, 2017, 8:11 PM · Mary Ellen I saw that in the article too ... it struck me the same way. I wonder if he plays viola on the street just because it's louder. It's an extremely stressful thing that our star soloists are doing. They make it seem very glamorous going from city to city playing brilliant concertos but it's a hard life. Maybe less lonely now that they can be connected at least electronically to their families.
Edited: December 12, 2017, 8:17 PM ·
Thank you all for your added comments.

I really appreciate it.

Edited: December 12, 2017, 9:48 PM · I saw a busker playing Mendelssohn, Paganini Caprice 1 and Bach Chaconne on Youtube as well. I wonder how this guy compares with Azmon.

For that Mendelssohn occasionally he got a note out of tune, but his violin should not be in the $$$ and could be a significant hold-back factor for his playing? And maybe street musicians could do a lot better in a serious performance setting (with perhaps more concentration and preparation) rather than sitting and playing casually on the street.

Edited: December 18, 2017, 9:18 AM ·

I've just listened to this, just now.
Ezra was at the 17:11 mark on the timer.
Very cool.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wBhq2Gomupg

Edited: December 18, 2017, 9:18 AM ·

Hi Will,

Violinists are like rock stars, man.

Checkout Malmsteen's first album if you've never heard of him.
This is the album that put him right into the spotlight and made him famous. Many of today's metal guitarists are influenced by Malmsteen's neo-classical style.
He was influenced by J. S. Bach.

I'd love to hear a violinist cover some of Malmsteen's pieces/solos.
I never even checked if anyone has covered his pieces on violin.
The guy is a monster.

He was only 21 when he released his groundbreaking, first album in 1984.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p8kyqn5Z2Zo

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yngwie_Malmsteen


Enjoy if this is new for you.

Robbie


Edited: December 18, 2017, 9:19 AM ·

I've found this.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZKbPPuaHnxw

December 13, 2017, 1:57 AM · "wondered if he'd tried some of the strategies for performance anxiety"

Sure, one of those strategies is to go busking. :)

December 13, 2017, 5:00 AM · I've never played the viola, but I've noticed he's holding it way too low, right?

Like the scroll is pointing way too much to the ground, instead of pointing straight and horizontal more or less.

December 13, 2017, 9:12 AM · Tim ... yes, he probably would benefit from using a shoulder rest.
Edited: December 18, 2017, 9:19 AM ·

Hi all,

I've just noticed there is a PLAY button for an audio documentary on Ezra which includes an interview with him.

It begins with some people's addictions and then it leads into the Ezra Azmon story in the link Mary-Ellen provided which i will add to this post.

Check for the PLAY button and give it a listen.
http://www.cbc.ca/radio/docproject/features/from-soloist-to-busker-why-ezra-azmon-chooses-to-play-on-the-streets-1.4316592/from-soloist-to-busker-why-ezra-azmon-chooses-to-play-on-the-streets-1.4347816
Enjoy!

Robbie

December 13, 2017, 11:30 AM · Tim, cellists strings are often near-vertical, and thet seem to manage: why not violists'?!
Edited: December 18, 2017, 9:20 AM ·

Hi Adrian,

You MUST be getting old if you forget your age. lol
I just read your profile. Great sense of humor you have there.

Robbie

December 13, 2017, 1:51 PM · Adrian, I don't think it's a good idea to prove your point about viola holding if you compare it to cello holding. There's nothing in common.

When I first noticed how low the scroll was, I thought it was "bad", but since I've never played the viola, I asked here so may be one violist here could tell me that due to their size, it's normal to hold it down. But I see you're supposed to hold it like a violin more or less, so definitely I don't think he is holding the viola right.

December 13, 2017, 2:35 PM · I thought Adrian made a good point. Why does a stringed instrument need to be played horizontally? Or any instrument in any position, aside from tradition or ergonomics?
December 13, 2017, 3:06 PM · Well, comparing the cello to the violin or viola in terms of holding it... doesn't make any sense, I don't think an explanation is needed.

I don't mean "horizontally" and totally parallel to the ground using a ruler. I mean that you're supposed to play it more or less horizontally, definitely not like he is playing it. From an aesthetic point of view, it's simply ugly to hold it pointing down. From a technical point of view, it's simply better to hold it horizontally, specially for the bow hand.

Edited: December 13, 2017, 3:32 PM · Aesthetics are a matter of taste and what you're used to; not a strong argument why you "should" conform.

What makes things better for the bow hand on horizontal strings? Cellists have no problem bowing on vertical strings and the bow hold is fairly similar as far ad I can tell.

I can guess why my teacher corrects me when.I droop the violin: due to shoulder rest and chin rest, drooping (to see the teacher or sheet music) is accomplished by bending my back; I can see that that is not desirable.

December 13, 2017, 3:56 PM · OK I'm not gonna argue about such a basic topic, why you should play with your scroll pointing horizontally. Go ahead and play the violin like a cello, good luck. I don't even know why you still mention the cello, whatever.
December 13, 2017, 4:12 PM · Robbie, these are interesting links, thank you :D
Edited: December 18, 2017, 9:20 AM ·

Thank you, Will. What do you think of Malmsteen?

Hi all,

I'm just wondering.

Could it be part of classical-training that all instruments should be held and performed in a certain way/position only to conform to how an orchestra or ensemble should look like while performing?

Can we imagine how wild an orchestra would appear if everyone had their own crazy way of moving about while playing?

Ezra is a free guy, now. He no longer has to conform to all of that.
Now, he's a showman - doing what a showman does. Showing off, breaking all the rules and still playing all the right notes.

Think of how Jimi Hendrix played guitar behind his back and his head. It's showmanship, no?
A guitar teacher would never approve of playing guitar in such positions.

See Ezra's many other videos where he performs with a pianist or with others in a "classical performance setting" which is NOT on a street corner or in a subway station.

Could it be he is simply weaving around and bowing down as a form of showmanship - saying to the spectators?...
"Look what I can do while still playing perfectly well."

I am sure (but i can be wrong), that if he were in a concert-hall with an orchestra, like he wanted, he would play using what he has learned regarding classical-form, to conform to the appearance of "orchestral etiquette" of a concert hall musician?

To me, you all seem to be studying his form, in a setting in which he is not playing (a concert-hall setting).
I mean, he's ALSO barefoot.

And they are, sort of, labeling him as, "the barefooted concert violin soloist busker".
Could it all be a part of his street image.
His feet have huge bunions and he maybe has difficulty wearing shoes.
I could have asked him when i recorded him but i didn't want to mention it.


Just my thoughts.
What do you think?


Robbie

Edited: December 14, 2017, 8:58 AM · What do I think?

I think and I know that showman ship can not imply bad posture or bad technique. Jimi Hendrix not only played the guitar up his head, he also played it all the time upside down, because he was left handed and his guitar was right handed. But you saw him and you felt he was natural, there was not bad technique, may be unorthodox way of playing, which doesn't mean it's bad. In example, how he used his thumb. Besides, when you play with your guitar up your head, you're not playing with bad technique, you can totally play with natural hand position and natural picking technique. Of course you'll get tired quickly and you're very limited to do certain things.

When I see a violin or viola pointing to the ground that much, I don't see showman ship or any kind of "cool" weird technique. I simply see a bad looking and bad posture. According then to your understanding of "showman ship", if a violinist is holding his bow like a hammer, let it be, it's just that you're classical brainwashed trained and can't see the beauty of that bow hold.

I don't care about "etiquette", It doesn't bug me that he's not wearing a smoking or wearing shoes. Indeed the only "etiquette" I see in classical music is the clothes. I won't accept and I think it's totally absurd to think that a good posture has anything to do with etiquette.

Edited: December 15, 2017, 8:03 PM · Depends how you define showmanship. Maybe when folks walk past a busker and see a nice high scroll and ideal classical form, they think, "Hmmm ... pro orchestra musician slumming here. Not giving him a dime." But if they see a barefoot, toothless, shabby-looking character with his rosin-caked instrument down on his chest and his bow in his fist, they think, "How can a guy who's down on his luck sound that good?" and they fill his case with coin. So ... which is the showman?
December 16, 2017, 1:40 AM · Hahaha, nice one actually. From now on, if a busker plays all nice and properly,no dime for him, probably a concertino of a near orchestra, but if he's hammering the violin and touching the floor with the scroll, that's the real deal.
December 16, 2017, 2:40 AM · @Robbie Actually I don't know much about guitar but I know Malmsteen is a very famous musician. In 2009, Time magazine rated Malmsteen as among the 10 greatest electric guitar players of all time.
December 16, 2017, 2:57 AM · Tim, you keep on stating "bad posture is bad because it's bad". So far you didn't give actual rational arguments. When you say: "I'm not gonna argue about such a basic topic", that's fine, but then you should actually stop repeating the same circular reasoning.
December 16, 2017, 6:05 AM · I mean sure.. but that is like telling someone that he is just saying murder is bad but it didn't really hold up because they don't explain why murder is bad. It isn't something that should have to be explained on a violin site dedicated to violinists. In addition you posit that perhaps classically held violin might not be the best way to hold the violin. As it is your argument the onus is on you to prove why. Not demand an explanation for which you won't be satisfied anyway.
December 16, 2017, 2:10 PM · Thank you Jessy. Exactly, normally when people ask these kind of questions, ain't no answer they will accept as valid.

Why do we hold the bow as we do?
You could go all technical, but I can always say: well that's pretty much your opinion, your bow hold is just classic etiquette and it's simply that you're not used to hold it like a hammer, but it's totally fine.

What I read was absurd, the violin posture is just classic etiquette?
Come on...

December 16, 2017, 4:31 PM · I don't think we even need to discuss about posture ...

The only thing that matters is he sounds good. With all his previous education and credentials as revealed by the quoted cbc article above, he should be more than aware of his low-holding position. Maybe it's more comfortable for him to hold the instrument that way.

I would certainly not hold a busker to classical or even normal standards, at the same time acknowledging that he is already better than 99% of other performers out there on the street.

Some people are able to perform very well despite the fact that their technique is flawed in the eyes of the beholders. For example, Whitney Houston's jaw-wobbling vibrato was incorrect from a voice training perspective, but she was great, wasn't she :-D

P/S As a side note, I know of a similar traditional string instrument in China where the performer plays it like a cello:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7fdFGEg-9R8

Edited: December 16, 2017, 5:08 PM · I absolutely dislike when singers use their jaws to do vibrato. It makes me cringe when I watch it at first. Afterwards I take a deep breath, exhale and remember that that is just the way they choose to do it, relax, and continue enjoying the music. :)
Edited: December 16, 2017, 8:38 PM · Ezra is a very interesting man and a friend. He is very talented and used to teach me violin years ago, but we often spent a lot of time discussing things like Buddhism, the nature of happiness, yoga. Which I enjoyed too.
He has an amazing range of repertoire even though as a busker he tells me he only plays Bach solo, mostly on viola.
He had a group called Celtic Ezra here for some years in which Patricia his wife also played and sang . He taught me some Klezmer music as well as Brahms and Bach.
I think I have rarely met anyone who is more non-conformist than Ezra.
December 16, 2017, 6:21 PM · Han, the similarities of holding a violin bow and a cello bow are:
1. For both you use the right hand.
2. For both the thumb is in opposition to the fingers.

And that's about it!

Edited: December 18, 2017, 9:14 AM ·

Originally posted by: Tim Ripond
Edited: December 14, 2017, 8:58 AM ·

"What do I think?
I think and I know that showman ship can not imply bad posture or bad technique. Jimi Hendrix not only played the guitar up his head, he also played it all the time upside down, because he was left handed and his guitar was right handed. But you saw him and you felt he was natural, there was not bad technique, may be unorthodox way of playing, which doesn't mean it's bad. In example, how he used his thumb. Besides, when you play with your guitar up your head, you're not playing with bad technique, you can totally play with natural hand position and natural picking technique. Of course you'll get tired quickly and you're very limited to do certain things."


-------------------------------------------------------------
Hi Tim,
Thanks for the comments.

Hendrix did flip a right-handed guitar over so he could play it left- handed, but you missed an important fact. He, actually, played it like a left-handed guitarist - meaning he re-strung the guitar to be played by a left-handed guitarist.

Albert King is one of a few left-handed guitarists to take a right-handed guitar,flip it over, AND NOT restring the guitar.
Hendrix would not have been able to play Albert King's guitar without first restringing King's guitar.
-----------------------------------------------------------------

Originally posted by: Tim Ripond
Edited: December 14, 2017, 8:58 AM ·

"When I see a violin or viola pointing to the ground that much, I don't see showman ship or any kind of "cool" weird technique. I simply see a bad looking and bad posture. According then to your understanding of "showman ship", if a violinist is holding his bow like a hammer, let it be, it's just that you're classical brainwashed trained and can't see the beauty of that bow hold."

I don't care about "etiquette", It doesn't bug me that he's not wearing a smoking or wearing shoes. Indeed the only "etiquette" I see in classical music is the clothes. I won't accept and I think it's totally absurd to think that a good posture has anything to do with etiquette."

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Tim,
I don't think etiquette means "proper attire".
If a man is well-dressed in a hand-made tuxedo, wearing diamond cuff-links and a Rolex watch, whose limo is waiting outside of the restaurant in which he's dining on Château Briand with his bare hands, taking swigs from an expensive bottle of Champagne, using the tablecloth as a serviette, being loud and obnoxious, belching loudly, and then cussing at the servers and Maitre d' when they, politely, inform him that he's being rude to the others in the dining room, he obviously has no etiquette.
So, etiquette is all about behavior - not about wearing the proper clothes.

I don't even know if there is a "proper etiquette" when performing in a
concert-hall with a full orchestra or not, but i have never seen one in which all the musicians were dressed in T-shirts, jeans, sneakers and baseball caps.
Also, when i see an orchestra perform, i never see any of the musicians moving around like Ezra, and that, would fall into the category of "behavior" or etiquette.

Seeing as Ezra Azmon is not playing in an orchestra on a street corner, he doesn't have to show any proper form or "orchestral etiquette" nor does he need to have his tuxedo dry-cleaned just to sweat out in the sun.

So the moving around and breaking all the forms of proper classical posture is what i meant by his "showmanship".

The Titanic sunk a long time ago and those musicians who performed died wearing proper attire and showing proper etiquette until their demise - at least, that's what the Titanic movie showed.
Azmon he can do what he wants to do on street.

I doubt anyone would hold back from giving him money on a street corner for having fun and not pretending he's standing up and stiff and straight like in a concert hall.

To me, and i'm sure to each passer-by, he looks like he's really enjoying himself - compared to the concert-hall musicians glued to their chairs all dressed up in fine clothing and not being allowed to physically express themselves in movement, as that is, i think, solely for the conductor.

Azmon moves like a reed in the wind.
It's rude to not acknowledge when someone tosses money into the instrument-case. So leaning forward (bowing) is expected. Besides, moving around attracts a lot of attention. The man is as free as a bird.
In conclusion: In order to break the rules (of proper posture and playing form) one must fully know the rules, and i am sure he does.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Okay, now i have another question for the forum, please.

Could any stringed orchestral musician in Azmon's class, move around as he does while playing and still hit all the right notes...or does doing that require a lot of practice?
I'm curious.

Thank you all, for reading this, and for your comments.
Robbie

Edited: December 17, 2017, 6:27 PM · If you think Azmon moves around a lot, wait until you see Chuanyun Li:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=lZk5_Z93rJ4

Another jaw-dropping example of blithering talent and skill utterly wasted.

December 17, 2017, 8:10 PM · If you really want to get unnecessarily steamed about posture, look up videos of the Brentano quartet.
December 17, 2017, 8:10 PM · If you really want to get unnecessarily steamed about posture, look up videos of the Brentano quartet.
Edited: December 18, 2017, 9:17 AM ·

Hi Paul and Irene

Okay but...my question was - can any violinist move around like Azmon does or does that require a lot of practice to move around like that while still hitting all the right notes?

Thanks,
Robbie

Edited: December 18, 2017, 9:21 AM ·

Hi Paul, Irene and Tim,

YEA! Hey, look! I'm certainly having my eyes opened up about how violinists, violists and cellists move around while playing, and how violinists and violists oftentimes point their scrolls at the floor while they perform sitting or standing in these videos.

Paul,
I'm quite sure after watching Chuanyun Li perform that he was a busker at some point, in China.
He's like a...rock and roller, this guy.
Please, checkout this video of him from the beginning, BUT, if you really want to get to the meat and potatoes, or perhaps i could say, the roasted chicken and fermented bean curd, of this video, just move the video time counter to the 4:30 mark and watch some very unorthodox bowing techniques that i don't think anybody, here, has seen, i could be wrong (i oftentimes am). He's unbelievably cheeky. Only a busker would do things like this, i think.
I wonder if he's ever squirted lighter fluid on it and threw a match at it and set his violin on fire while on stage like Hendrix did at The Monterey Pop Festival. I'm sure he's done it already, just for fun one day, you know, when nobody was watching.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vv0d1dmSaIQ

Irene,
The Brentano Quartet really does demonstrate a lot of "showmanship".
It all seems just a little under the top (to me), though. They seem so stiff.
I've watched a few different performances of this Beethoven Op. 133, Grosse Fuge by quartets and chamber orchestras and it seems the smaller the orchestra, the more they get to move around, which brings us back to soloist Ezra Azmon performing on the streets and moving as he wishes.
I was watching te quartet and was wondering when someone would get poked in the face with a bow.
Thank God they are well rehearsed and nobody got a bow in the eye.
It does seem that they have worked out some minor choreography in some parts of their many performance.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lxzHQrFuDkk

The Brentano Quartet reminds me, just a little bit, of New York City's Kiss Quartet performing Simmons' Deuce TV-74, in A major, in one movement.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YGQp7Snfk24
Check out how THEY move all throughout their electrifying performance.
I wonder if all quartets should move around like the Kiss quartet does. It's the ultimate form of self-expression by a quartet. They really grab the audience's attention, don't you all agree? Pfft, of course you all agree.

Tim,
I dunno, man. Scroll up or scroll down - the music still sounds the same, no?

Thanks for your comments. I appreciate it.
Robbie

December 17, 2017, 11:50 PM · *If you think Azmon moves around a lot, wait until you see Chuanyun Li*

Lindsey Stirling easily won both of them :D

Edited: December 18, 2017, 9:25 AM ·
Hi Will,

See the link in my previous post at the 4:30 mark on the time counter of Mr Li's video. IT'S WILD!

YES! I've seen some of Lindsey's videos.
She's something, too.

I would like to see Ezra Azmon get onto one of those (Country's) Got Talent TV shows and really make a name for himself to the masses on a world-wide scale and start recording in studios, and going on world tours.

Yea, Erza!!

Thanks for that, Will.
Robbie

December 18, 2017, 6:55 PM · Simply said: You can't scratch a violin like this... His viola is pretty forgiving and great sounding. His playing... meh... solid but too flashy for me
December 18, 2017, 7:08 PM ·

Hi Simon,

What does " 'scratch' a violin" mean, please?

I, also don't understand what you mean by
"His viola is pretty 'forgiving' ".
Are you saying his instrument is forgiving or what he's playing is forgiving?

When you say "flashy", do you mean he moves around too much?

I apologize for asking you to clarify your comments.


Thanks,
Robbie
Thank

Edited: December 19, 2017, 7:12 PM · Bottom line, he scratches a lot and on a violin it would sound even scratchier. His viola is more forgiving to uncontrolled bow pressure than a violin would be.
Flashy in the musical sense. Unsteady tempi and rushes difficulties. For a busker not bad, but also typical busker habits. Still nice, that he performs Bach and usually they stop after the Adagio and don't play the fugue. Takes some guts!
December 19, 2017, 9:43 PM · Robbie, posture also affects the sound. That man moving so much that he even plays back to the public is not nice. It's like this last decades new trend of singing in opera to the wall instead of to the public. When you play in a concert, project the sound to the public, all the time.

Besides, your thread is not a question thread, seeking opinions and comments. It's more like "whoever doesn't like something about this busker is gonna be questioned to the end and even deny something so basic like posture". Notice how every time someone points out a mistake, you reply defending the busker. It's more like you want us to say to you that this busker is God or something.

Edited: December 20, 2017, 12:36 PM ·


Hi, Simon and Tim,

Simon,
I've searched for youtube videos about scratching.
I understand, now, about the improper holding of the bow, too much bow pressure and speed, and cross bowing and how they all cause scratching.
Thank you. I appreciate the comments.

Tim,
I am learning. So chill, a bit. I've noticed you can get quite curt with people
I do appreciate your comments, though.


BUT...
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Originally posted on December 19, 2017, 9:43 PM by Tim Repond:

"Robbie.....whoever doesn't like something about this busker is gonna be questioned to the end and even deny something so basic like posture'. Notice how every time someone points out a mistake, you reply defending the busker. It's more like you want us to say to you that this busker is God or something."
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tim,i would really like to see you quote my exact words (using copy and paste) where i shot down anyone's comments about Ezra Azmon's technique, or where i "defended" Azmon when someone commented negatively in this thread.
Who am i to argue with professional violinists about their comments about another professional violinist's technique.
I AM NOT even A VIOLINST, Tim.
BUT i can ask questions.

I did ask about 'if there was a required posture during concert-hall performances, and then mentioned that Azmon is busking on street corners, and perhaps feels that concert hall posture was not improtant to him.

And i even showed a Brentano Quartet video clip, seven posts prior to yours, which shows some of those musicians pointing their scrolls down while they play.
Why don't you go and comment in youtube, under that video, and complain about how their scrolls are pointing down while performing in a concert hall?!
It's all here in this thread for all to read.

I'm reading a lot about posture while bowing a violin since i joined this forum.
It MUST be very important to warrant such nit-picky comments.

Especially, when you said that you don't want to argue about it, and then, you carry on arguing about it.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Originally posted on December 13, 2017, 3:56 PM by Tim Ripond

"OK I'm not gonna argue about such a basic topic, why you should play with your scroll pointing horizontally. Go ahead and play the violin like a cello, good luck. I don't even know why you still mention the cello, whatever."
------------------------------------------------------------------------


To me, it really seems like splitting hairs, while to you, and perhaps others, it's the end of the world as you know it.

Anyone (busking classical violinists included) NOT adhering to classical "proper" posture are worthy and deserving of very critical comments by Tim Ripond in a casual forum conversation. LOL But, i can see your point to some degree.

Azmon, who has become, in your mind, someone who deserves being referred to as, "That man...", really says a lot.

Furthermore, the only person in this thread whom i've corrected was you, my friend, and that's when i politely clarified to you about Hendrix' "upside-down, right-handed guitar", and then, concerning your - personal -
definition of the word "etiquette", which you (mistakenly) considered to be all about "proper attire".

It's very obvious, to me, that you do not enjoy being corrected in any way or form. That is not my problem - it seems to be more of a personal issue within you.

I asked for comments, and you've certainly offered your repeated posture comment, MORE than once.

I really thank you for your comment(s), Tim.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p08aplisemU


Robbie

December 20, 2017, 3:09 PM · "That man" was referring to the asian guy, whose name I did not remember, that came up in the lasts messages because people wanted you to see a violinist moving a lot. Not gonna waste time pointing out all the mistakes you've said in your last big message, but hey, one thing clear: I'm not being corrected since I'm not being judged by anyone, this thread is not talking about me.

You say you're not even a violinist... what in heavens, now that explains a lot of things. I'm completely relaxed, thank you. Have a nice day.

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