Italian violins from violin making schools

July 28, 2017, 3:26 AM · Hello!

I'm new here and would like more info and/or details about Italian violins made by students. Surely, all luthiers start as beginners, right? So where do most of the instruments end up? Are they put up for sale? I tried searching for similar posts, but found none so I started this post.

Thanks,

Anthony

Replies (8)

July 28, 2017, 4:44 AM · What about violins made by American students in America?
And yes, all luthiers start as beginners, but the learning curve is slow.
July 28, 2017, 8:38 AM · I'm sure they're sold somewhere. I'm sure many of them are decent enough for student use.
July 30, 2017, 11:06 AM · LUIS CLAUDIO MANFIO, I'm not from America haha. It's just that I see Italian violins as pricier so I'm curious how those "starting" Italian violins would be priced on the market.

Ella Yu, now I'm really interested. :))

I remember two (allegedly) unlabeled Italian violins being sold online a few years ago. The seller stated that he bought them in Italy and purposely had it unlabeled so it could be cheaper and to not have problems handling the instrument back home. They were 600 and 800 USD respectively... :| :))

July 30, 2017, 12:56 PM · "The seller stated that he bought them in Italy and purposely had it unlabeled so it could be cheaper and to not have problems handling the instrument back home. They were 600 and 800 USD respectively... :| :))"

Probably Italians having fun selling Chinese violins to the tourists, especially at that price...

July 30, 2017, 1:10 PM · Anthoni Di, if I am not wrong, the most expensive violins by contemporary makers are not by Italian makers.
Unless you really know what you are doing, don't get instruments online.
July 30, 2017, 6:03 PM · While the subject happens to be on Italian violins can I possibly ask a couple questions about a couple violins I have just acquired from an estate that were handed down by the grandfather which was a luthier by the name of Schultz from the early 1900's?
July 30, 2017, 9:22 PM · The usual outcome of stories like these is that they are usually German or Czech production violins from the early 1900s
July 31, 2017, 8:50 AM · This post reminds me of how dentists are trained -- on the job. If you go to a dental school you can get free or inexpensive care from dental students who need to practice their craft on a live person. Of course their work is overseen by a licensed dentist who makes sure you do not leave damaged. Maybe the same kind of thing with violins, but obviously the stakes are lower because a violin is an inanimate object. If the violin does not sound good you can take it apart and regrade the top or whatever.

http://dental.tufts.edu/patient-care/how-to-become-a-patient/



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