Welcome to Violinist.com! Log in, or join the community!
Violinist.com
Facebook Twitter Google+ Email Newsletter

Jubin's Graded Repertoire

Repertoire: I am a self-centered, stuck-up violinist who refuses to use other peoples' repertoire lists. So, I made my own.

From Jubin Matloubieh
Posted December 18, 2006 at 05:39 AM

Ok, so maybe I am a little hard on myself. But after being frustrated with the amount of ambiguity in many graded repertoire lists and hearing so many music teachers, professors, and students complain, I have taken it upon myself to create my own graded repertoire (with help from many sources). The criteria for each level is not specific, as that would mean 110 different analyses of each work. However, I have taken into consideration the technique and musicality required to play the pieces (bow control, dexerity, vibrato, flexibility, tone quality, and tempo among other things). For this reason, the Paganini concertos are not higher in level than other, technically easier pieces (such as Barber and Beethoven) for the reason that Barber and Beethoven require more insight and knowledge to play. Tonality is also taken into account. The levels range from 1-13+, 1 being the easiest and + being disgusting. Please feel free to comment, inquire, reject, or add (or some other verb) to this list. I am not perfect, so if I have missed something important, misspelled something, or misjudged a piece, please let me know. Please keep in mind, these are pieces for solo violin and orchestra.

Here goes nothing...

Violin Concertos/Concert Pieces:
□ Level 1:
o Reiding: Concerto in B minor
o Seitz: Concerto No. 2 in G major
o Seitz: Concerto No. 5 in D major
□ Level 2:
o Seitz: Concerto No. 3 in G minor
o Vivaldi: Concerto in A minor, Op. 2 No. 8
□ Level 3:
o Massenet: Méditation from Thaïs
o Vivaldi: Concerto in G minor, from Suzuki Book 5 or another source
□ Level 4:
o Accolay: Concerto in A minor
o Haydn: Concerto in G major
□ Level 5:
o Bach: Concerto No. 1
o Bach: Concerto No. 2
o Bach: Concerto No. 3 (double)
o de Beriot: Violin Concerto No. 9
o Mozart: Adagio in E major
o Vivaldi: Spring
o Vivaldi: Summer
□ Level 6:
o Beethoven: Romance in G major
o Haydn: Concerto in C major
o Kabalevsky: Concerto in C major
o Kreisler: Concerto in the style of Vivaldi
o Mozart: Concerto No. 3 in G major
o Mozart: Rondo in B-flat major
o Mozart: Rondo in C major
o Mozart: Rondo in G major from “Haffner” Serenade
o Tchaikovsky: Sérénade Mélancolique
o Vivaldi: Autumn
o Vivaldi: Winter
o Weinaiwski: Légende in G minor
□ Level 7:
o Beethoven: Romance in F major
o Bloch: Baal Shem
o Mozart: Concerto No. 1 in B-flat major
o Mozart: Concerto No. 2 in D major
o Vitali: Chaconne in G minor
□ Level 8:
o Berlioz: Rêverie et Caprice
o Mozart: Concerto No. 4 in D major
o Mozart: Concerto No. 5 in A major
o Mozart (attributed): Concerto No. 6 in E-flat major
o Novacek: Perpetuum Mobile
o Paganini: Moto Perpetuo
o Svendsen: Romance in G major
o Tchaikovsky: Souvenir d’un Lieu Cher
o Vaughan-Williams: The Lark Ascending
o Viotti: Concerto No. 22 in A minor
o Viotti: Concerto No. 23 in G minor
□ Level 9:
o Bartók: Rhapsody No. 1
o Bartók: Rhapsody No. 2
o Bruch: Concerto No. 1 in G minor
o Khachaturian: Concerto in D minor
o Rimsky-Korsakov: Flight of the Bumblebee
o Saint-Saëns: Havanaise in E major
o Saint-Saëns: Concerto No. 3 in B minor
o Sarasate: Introduction and Tarantella
o Sarasate: Zapateado
o Szymanowski: Concerto No. 1
o Szymanowski: Concerto No. 2
o Tchaikovsky: Valse-Scherzo
o Wienaiwski: Concerto No. 2 in D minor
□ Level 10:
o Adams: Concerto
o Bartók: Concerto No. 1
o Bazzini: La Ronde de Lutins
o Bernstein: Serenade
o Bruch: Scottish Fantasy
o Chausson: Poème in E-flat minor
o Corigliano: Chaconne
o Dinicu: Hora Staccato
o Dvorak: Romance in F minor
o Glass: Concerto
o Glazunov: Concerto in A major
o Goldmark: Concerto in A minor
o Hao-Kang: Butterfly Lovers’ Concerto
o Korngold: Concerto in D major
o Lalo: Symphonie Espagnol in D minor
o Mendelssohn: Concerto in E minor
o Myaskovsky: Concerto in D minor
o Paganini: Concerto No. 1 in D major
o Paganini: Concerto No. 2 in B minor
o Paganini: Concerto No. 3 in E major
o Paganini: Concerto No. 4 in D minor
o Paganini: Concerto No. 5 in A minor
o Paganini: Concerto No. 6 in E minor
o Prokofiev: Concerto No. 2 in G major
o Ravel: Tzigane
o Rorem: Concerto
o Penderecki: Concerto
o Saint-Saëns: Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso in A minor
o Schnittke: Concerto Grosso No. 5
o Schoenberg: Phantasy
o Schubert: Fantasy in C major
o Schumann: Fantaisie
o Shostakovich: Concerto No. 2 in C-sharp minor
o Weinberg: Concerto in G minor
□ Level 11:
o Barber: Concerto
o Beethoven: Concerto in D major
o Berg: Concerto
o Brahms: Concerto in D major
o Britten: Concerto in D minor
o Dvorak: Concerto in A minor
o Elgar: Concerto in B minor
o Nielsen: Concerto
o Prokofiev: Concerto No. 1 in D major
o Sarasate: Carmen Fantasy
o Shostakovich: Concerto No. 1 in A minor
o Sibelius: Concerto in D minor
o Stravinsky: Concerto in D major
o Tchaikovsky: Concerto in D major
o Walton: Concerto
o Waxman: Carmen Fantasy
□ Level 12:
o Bartók: Concerto No. 2
o Wienaiwski: Concerto No. 1 in F-sharp minor
□ Level 13+ (ie disgusting):
o Gubaidulina: Offertorium
o Ligeti: Concerto
o Schoenberg: Concerto


Please be nice.

From Willie M
Posted on December 18, 2006 at 05:54 AM
It looks really good!
From Stephen Brivati
Posted on December 18, 2006 at 06:04 AM
Greetings,
that`s a really interesting project and I think you have done alot of thoughtful work.
I agree with you about some of the lists currently available although the ASTA one is pretty good in my opinion. It does, as you say depend on a slew of factors that are very subjective and after you have tried to factor those in you are still stuck with the problem of individual differences in players and there relative streengths. For example, when I was a kid I played a lot of Wieniawski . I did the concerto very early on (after de beroiot 9) so that would be much lower down the list than some concertos that would have exposed my weaknesses more. The problems you note lead , in my opinion, to the greatest amount of diiiculty in classifying the sort of middle area which may at leats superficially not be so demanding. Thus your list suggest the first two concertos and the Vitali Chaccone are more difficult than Mozart three which I would beg to differ slightly with.
The next section is more problematic for me perosnally. I think the Viotti is a rather akward , hybrid work that is fairly essential for violnists, but does not compare with difficulty to the Mozart concertos. Likewise I play the Tchaikovsky Souveniers regularly without a qualm, but having to do the Mozart (4and5) in public is tough for me. I console myself with the knowledge that Heifetz also ranked thos pieces extremely high in terms of technique, perhaps in the sense you are talking about. I also think the Moto Perpetuo is harder than you give it credit for. Auer did describe it as the hardest finger and bow coordianation @piece around. (Times may have changed...)Its certainly much harder than the Novacek.
I think one measure of the dififculty contiane din the Mozart works is that virtually all orchetsras demand one of those works plus a romantic conerto for a job.
Thanks for taking the trouble to do this,
Cheers,
buri
From Stephen Brivati
Posted on December 18, 2006 at 06:05 AM
BTW did you miss the Joachim and Ernst f sharp minor?
Take a gander at Rosands performance. Stunning.
Cheers,
buri
From Jubin Matloubieh
Posted on December 18, 2006 at 08:01 AM
buri,

like you said this list is very subjective and technique does vary from person to person. for example, i am playing havanaise, mozart 5, and bach a minor partita, but can not do fast arpeggios to save my life. as to you concern with the mozart, i feel the same way, but did not want to add another level simply for them (im lazy). the chaconne is difficult in is own right as it requires great bow control, technique, and tone quality. i based the viotti off of my friend, who was told she shouldnt be playing them because they are too easy for her. the moto perpetuo is down a few spots for the same reason as the paganini concerti, not much required musicality. while the novacek perpetuum mobile might be faster to learn, it does have some musical demands. i was hesitant about that too, but after some consultation with some of the eastman school professors, was persuaded. i did not include ernst and joachim because i do not own a copy of them. i have heard they are fiendishly difficult,bbut as i have neither seen the score nor heard a recording, i would not judge.

perhaps switching the viotti concertos with the first two mozart concertos and moving mozart 3 to level 7 or 8 would work better? my hesitation stems in hearing from many people that mozart 3 is easier than the other mozart concertos and that mozart 4 and 5 are the hardest.

From Anne Horvath
Posted on December 18, 2006 at 02:35 PM
Jubin ,this is a good list.
Where/How do you incorporate the violin/piano repertiore (e.g. Kreisler pieces, Sinding Suite etc.)?
Also, where/how do you incorporate Bach S&P?
Also, I am assuming that within each level, you do mix up the order? For example, in Level 5, do you really teach three Bach concertos in a row?
And do you have an etude list too?

It is really generous of you to post your list. I have printed it out, and plan to study it over. I have a list too, but I am not only self-centered and stuck-up, I am selfish too.

From Jubin Matloubieh
Posted on December 19, 2006 at 02:50 AM
I have not studied all of the Kreisler pieces in depth. I did mention above that these are somewhat standard concertante works for violin. The Bach S&P are very varied in difficulty. My next idea with the list is to include the solo violin repertoire (as it is not as large as the violin and piano repertoire). I am working hard on my list, but I have 5 AP classes, 2 instruments, swim team, boy scouts, and like 5 clubs to tend to, so this list is what I do in my spare time (yay geeks!!!). In response to the question about order, this is not a method by any means. It is simply my answer to "What can I play next?" or "I need to find something to play at ___ level, soon." I would not suggest learning the pieces in the order I have presented, as I am in no way a pedagogue, but based on opinions collected, I have ranked the pieces based on overall difficulty. For example, the first two movements of the Barber might make it a level 9, however, the third movement is blisteringly difficult. I am going by the assumption that people who start a piece will play the WHOLE piece (including the Intermezzo in Symphonie Espagnol, my favorite movement). These are also subject ot some of my personal experiences. I mentioned before that I can not play fast arpeggios; I failed to mention that beyond two flats, I am lost in terms of key signature (strangely, I can play pieces with all seven sharps OvO^?). That is one reason why Scottish Fantasy and Poeme are higher on the list (not to mention the technique and tone/dynamic control). Besides, if you think about it, no one in their right mind learns all six of Paganini's concertos in a row (if you notice, the list is alphabetical so as not to offend anyone within particular levels).
From Maura Gerety
Posted on December 19, 2006 at 03:03 AM
Good list--I'm too lazy to write my own, I usually settle for writing snarky comments in the margins of thrice-xeroxed copies passed from teacher to teacher.
One thing, are you sure the Dvorak belongs in level 11, along with Brahms and Shostakovich?

p.s. have you heard the Ligeti concerto? I've not heard it yet but Ligeti is by far my favorite 21st century composer. :)

Edit: Sarasate Carmen fantasy also looks a bit too high-graded--I've not studied it yet but I've klutzed through it a few times just for fun, and while it's tricky it falls very well under the fingers and there are no ridiculous stretches or obscene passagework. :)

From Jubin Matloubieh
Posted on December 19, 2006 at 03:36 AM
If Dvorak wasn't as hard as Brahms or Shostakovich, I would be playing it right now. It sounds best with orchestra. I am not sure about that as much as the others, but from other people who have learned/are learning it, I have gathered that it is very hard. Besides, I thought there was some very tricky passage work at the end of the piece.

As for the two Carmen Fantasies, I feel they are harder than the other level 10s, but easier than the level 11s. I simply think it is unnecessary to create a level simply for them.

Thanks everyone for being so nice about a sixteen-year-olds repertoire grading. The violin solos are coming soon; I have to finish fine-combing each of the Paganini Caprices before I post it. Bach and Ysaye took me forever.

From Stephen Brivati
Posted on December 19, 2006 at 03:55 AM
Greetings,
I agree with Maura about the Sarasate. It demands a flashy technique but muscially it does not compare with the rest in that group. Those majpor concertos require intimate knowledge of the score and study of the composers ouvre. Then there are questions of stamina, breadth of vision, life experience etc. A lot of kids with flash tehcnique can play the Sarasate but are not up to the demand sof the cocnertos you group it with.
I also think The Dvorak concerto is quite a bit easier than many of those concertos.
Cheers,
Buri
From Maura Gerety
Posted on December 19, 2006 at 04:59 AM
Yeah...I've done about half the Dvorak, will learn the rest once I'm done with auditions, but if I tried to pick up Brahms or Shosti right now I'd probably end up face-down and bleeding on the practice room floor. Dvorak has some nasty passages but IMO it's much more manageable than something like Shosti. Then again, apparently for you it's the other way round. :)
From Willie M
Posted on December 19, 2006 at 05:06 AM
What about the Walton? It seems much more difficult than Dvorak, tchaik, and sibelius.
From Jude Ziliak
Posted on December 19, 2006 at 06:15 AM
Just out of curiosity, what about the Barber makes you put it in level 11?
From Anne Horvath
Posted on December 19, 2006 at 02:55 PM
Jubin, I like to teach Rieding's Concertino in A minor, which would fit into your Level 2.
The Nardini E minor concerto (Gingold International Edition) is a very nice piece that would fit into your Level 4.
From al ku
Posted on December 19, 2006 at 03:28 PM
i will be nice by saying that thank god there is a high school kid here that is using his time thoughtfully.
From Pieter Viljoen
Posted on December 19, 2006 at 08:42 PM
I agree, it's not too hard to schlepp through the Carmen fantasy. I wouldn't say it's as hard as Sibelius for example.
From Kevin Jang
Posted on December 21, 2006 at 07:35 PM
The Tchaik Valse scherzo is much harder than people think...I would think the Paganini concerti would be higher up...especially if you are playing the Sauret cadenza...the Paganini is harder than the Sarasate Carmen...David Updegraff, a wonderful violin teacher, told me when I studied the Saint Saens Intro and Rondo with him that he feels that the Saint Saens is more difficult than the Sarasate Carmen on a musical and technical standpoint. I agree with this. With the exception of the last two pages, the Sarasate is not too bad. Musically it is pretty straight foward - good sensuous tone and bravura. The Saint Saens is a little more sophisticated. To capture the Gallic quailty is quite difficult and the third page and the last two are not easy by any means. I've heard people butcher this piece much more than the Carmen...

Ask anyone who has played the Schubert Fantasy...ridiculously hard and tempermental in performance and it's for violin and piano only.

From Stephen Brivati
Posted on December 21, 2006 at 08:44 PM
Greetings,
absoultely. The Schubert stuff is horribly akward,
Cheers,
Buri
From Jubin Matloubieh
Posted on December 21, 2006 at 02:04 AM
Hello everyone,

Thank you for your comments. I am reading each of them and revising my list based on your ideas.

Buri, Maura, Pieter, and Kevin, I have concluded that you are correct (not that this was an arguement). After going back and looking, I do agree on the Sarasate Carmen Fantasy. It should be placed down a level. I do not have the music for the Waxman Carmen Fantasy. Does anyone know how that compares? I have heard (and violinmasterclass.com agrees) it is similar in difficulty to the Sarasate.

Buri and Muara, the same thing with the Dvorak. It is not as difficult as the other concerti in that level.

Jude, I have moved the Barber down a level, but not really (you will see why). It ranks high because of the brilliance and difficulty of the final movement.

Willie, the Walton (in my humble opinion ;P) is not as musically difficult as Tchaikovsky or Sibelius. It is very challenging, technically, but in terms of musicality (and once again, my opinion), it does not compare as well. I do hesitate in saying this, though, because I looked at the score for the Walton and, well ... let's just say I will probably never play it.

Anne, thank you. I have added them. Do you or does anyone else have more information on Reiding or Seitz, or really anything that could go in the first few levels. I skipped a lot of repertoire, so I do not know many of the basic pieces.

Kevin, I misplaced the Valse-Scherzo. It should have been in level 10. As for the Paganini concertos, technically, I agree, but musically, I do not. See the revised list. I moved them up. And for the Schubert Fantasy, I saw a performance of it with orchestra. All of the pieces on this list go: w/ orchestra --> w/ piano, or vice-versa. I felt the need to include them, seeing as the list for violin and piano will take a very long time.

I am going to add the new list within a few minutes. This now includes new revisions, commentary on the levels, and a list for violin solos. Once again, thank you for the help.

-Jubin

From Jubin Matloubieh
Posted on December 22, 2006 at 01:02 AM
The revised/new lists:

Violin Concertos/Concert Pieces:

□ Level 1 (yay first concertos; ooo, a minor key):
o Reiding: Concerto in B minor
o Seitz: Concerto No. 2 in G major
o Seitz: Concerto No. 5 in D major
□ Level 2 (yay more first concertos/first non-student concerto):
o Reiding: Concertino in A minor
o Seitz: Concerto No. 3 in G minor
o Vivaldi: Concerto in A minor, Op. 2, No. 8
□ Level 3 (ooo, the first steps into the real repertoire; vibrato is necessary at this point):
o Massenet: Méditation from Thaïs
o Vivaldi: Concerto in G minor (the one that’s in Suzuki Book 5)
□ Level 4 (good pieces for learning):
o Accolay: Concerto in A minor
o Haydn: Concerto in G major
o Nardini: Concerto in E minor
□ Level 5 (big gap between levels 4 and 5; etudes and other violin works should be supplemented in between):
o Bach: Concerto No. 1
o Bach: Concerto No. 2
o Bach: Concerto No. 3 (double)
o de Beriot: Concerto No. 9
o Mozart: Adagio in E major
o Vivaldi: Spring
o Vivaldi: Summer
□ Level 6 (the first major concertos surface; good lyrical stuff):
o Beethoven: Romance in G major
o Haydn: Concerto in C major
o Kabalevsky: Concerto in C major
o Kreisler: Concerto in the style of Vivaldi
o Mozart: Concerto No. 3 in G major
o Mozart: Rondo in B-flat major
o Mozart: Rondo in C major
o Mozart: Rondo in G major from “Haffner” Serenade
o Tchaikovsky: Sérénade Mélancolique
o Vivaldi: Autumn
o Vivaldi: Winter
o Weinaiwski: Légende in G minor
□ Level 7 (this is the “tone” level; here, many aspects of tone are learned):
o Beethoven: Romance in F major
o Bloch: Baal Shem
o Viotti: Concerto No. 22 in A minor
o Viotti: Concerto No. 23 in G minor
o Vitali: Chaconne in G minor
□ Level 8 (lots of Mozart to learn; left hand technique is developed):
o Berlioz: Rêverie et Caprice
o Mozart: Concerto No. 1 in B-flat major
o Mozart: Concerto No. 2 in D major
o Mozart: Concerto No. 4 in D major
o Mozart: Concerto No. 5 in A major
o Mozart (attributed): Concerto No. 6 in E-flat major
o Novacek: Perpetuum Mobile
o Paganini: Moto Perpetuo
o Svendsen: Romance in G major
o Tchaikovsky: Souvenir d’un Lieu Cher
o Vaughan-Williams: The Lark Ascending
□ Level 9 (exotic/worldly themes here; maybe the first level in the “upper end of the repertoire”):
o Bartók: Rhapsody No. 1
o Bartók: Rhapsody No. 2
o Bruch: Concerto No. 1 in G minor
o Khachaturian: Concerto in D minor
o Rimsky-Korsakov: Flight of the Bumblebee
o Saint-Saëns: Havanaise in E major
o Saint-Saëns: Concerto No. 3 in B minor
o Sarasate: Introduction and Tarantella
o Sarasate: Zapateado
o Shostakovich: Sonata
o Szymanowski: Concerto No. 1
o Szymanowski: Concerto No. 2
o Wienaiwski: Concerto No. 2 in D minor
□ Level 10 (wow, a lot is covered here; a gap between 9 and 10, reflect on your playing, work to refine the beauty of your playing, know your music history and musical styles; modern/20th century becomes prominent; atonality/free key is introduced; WARNING, have knowledge of the previous repertoire before delving in here):
o Adams: Concerto
o Bartók: Concerto No. 1
o Bazzini: La Ronde de Lutins
o Bernstein: Serenade
o Bruch: Scottish Fantasy
o Chausson: Poème in E-flat minor
o Corigliano: Chaconne
o Dinicu: Hora Staccato
o Dvorak: Romance in F minor
o Glass: Concerto
o Hao-Kang: Butterfly Lovers’ Concerto
o Lalo: Symphonie Espagnol in D minor
o Mendelssohn: Concerto in E minor
o Myaskovsky: Concerto in D minor
o Prokofiev: Concerto No. 2 in G major
o Rorem: Concerto
o Penderecki: Concerto
o Schnittke: Concerto Grosso No. 5
o Schoenberg: Phantasy
o Schubert: Fantasy in C major
o Schumann: Fantaisie
o Shostakovich: Concerto No. 2 in C-sharp minor
o Tchaikovsky: Valse-Scherzo
o Weinberg: Concerto in G minor
□ Level 11 (these are between levels 10 and 12; solid flashy technique is an absolute must; also multiple musical styles, so be careful)
o Barber: Concerto
o Dvorak: Concerto in A minor
o Glazunov: Concerto in A major
o Goldmark: Concerto in A minor
o Korngold: Concerto in D major
o Paganini: Concerto No. 1 in D major
o Paganini: Concerto No. 2 in B minor
o Paganini: Concerto No. 3 in E major
o Paganini: Concerto No. 4 in D minor
o Paganini: Concerto No. 5 in A minor
o Paganini: Concerto No. 6 in E minor
o Ravel: Tzigane
o Saint-Saëns: Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso in A minor
o Sarasate: Carmen Fantasy
o Waxman: Carmen Fantasy
□ Level 12 (know your stuff before tackling these works; these are all MAJOR concerti, so you will want a score to study and multiple recordings):
o Beethoven: Concerto in D major
o Berg: Concerto
o Brahms: Concerto in D major
o Britten: Concerto in D minor
o Elgar: Concerto in B minor
o Nielsen: Concerto
o Prokofiev: Concerto No. 1 in D major
o Shostakovich: Concerto No. 1 in A minor
o Sibelius: Concerto in D minor
o Stravinsky: Concerto in D major
o Tchaikovsky: Concerto in D major
o Walton: Concerto
□ Level 13 (really hard/somewhat violinistic; these are the hardest, truly heard pieces in the repertoire; THEY ARE F-CKING HARD; huge double stops, moving tenths, microtones, and just plain awkwardness):
o Bartók: Concerto No. 2
o Wienaiwski: Concerto No. 1 in F-sharp minor
□ Level 14+ (ie disgusting/not violinistic; THESE ARE FOR THE CLINICALLY INSANE ONLY; these pieces are written for six-fingered Paganini’s; they are very ATONAL; some people do not even consider them music; few people have ever recorded/wanted to record these; play these only when you have played EVERYTHING ABOVE so that you are too old to play the violin and will spare our ears (jk)):
o Gubaidulina: Offertorium
o Ligeti: Concerto
o Schoenberg: Concerto


Violin Solo (in most cases, someone later wrote a piano accompaniment, but in modern times, these are played solo)

□ Level 1:
□ Level 2:
□ Level 3:
□ Level 4 (one of the best-known pieces in the world; you need to be in tune):
o Bach: Suite No. 1 (trans. from cello)
□ Level 5 (chords become prominent):
o Bach: Suite No. 2 (trans. from cello)
o Bach: Suite No. 3 (trans. from cello)
□ Level 6 (changing rhythm, but you tone must remain high in quality):
o Bach: Suite No. 4 (trans. from cello)
□ Level 7 (the first “real” Bach, but do not take it lightly at all; need bow control; learn double stops; even the Suites begin to resemble Bach Unaccompanied):
o Bach: Partita No. 3 in E major
o Bach: Suite No. 5 (trans. from cello)
o Bach: Suite No. 6 (trans. from cello)
□ Level 8 (introduction to the FUGUE; chords are featured often):
o Bach: Partita No. 1 in B minor
o Bach: Sonata No. 1 in G minor
□ Level 9 (introduction to the CHACONNE; chords everywhere; work on tone refinement, no crunchiness):
o Bach: Partita No. 2 in D minor
o Bach: Sonata No. 2 in A minor
□ Level 10 (a verrrrrry long fugue; cool Ysayë stuff; violinistic, but still hard):
o Bach: Sonata No. 3 in C major
o Ysayë: Sonata No. 2
o Ysayë: Sonata No. 3
o Ysayë: Sonata No. 4
□ Level 11 (this stuff is violinistic, but much more is demanded from the violinist):
o Paganini: Caprices 6, 12, 14, 20
o Paganini: God Save the King variations
o Penderecki: Cadenza
o Tartini: The Art of Bowing
o Wienaiwski: God Save the Queen Variations
o Wienaiwski: Etude-Caprices
o Ysayë: Sonata No. 5
□ Level 12 (violinism is parting us; you need SOLID technique for these; work on stretching your land large distances and playing two scale at once, meaning one with fingers and bow normally, and the other with left hand pizzicato):
o Bartók: Sonata for Solo Violin
o Ernst: Polyphonic Etudes
o Ernst: The Last Rose of Summer
o Paganini: Caprices 1-5, 7-11, 13, 15-19, 21-24
o Paganini: Nel cor più non mi Sento
o Ysayë: Sonata No. 1
o Ysayë: Sonata No. 6
□ Level 13+ (supposedly unplayable, but idk):
o Cage: Freedman Etudes

From Anne Horvath
Posted on December 22, 2006 at 02:57 AM
Nice work, Jubin.
You might want to look at some of Huber's student concertos. I teach his Op.8, #4 in G major before moving on to Seitz #2 or #5. Also, Huber's Op 6, #2 in G major (first and third position) is a piece I teach before Seitz Op 15, #4 in D major. (Seitz #4 and #3 are fairly interchangeable).
I also like to teach Rode Op.9, # 7 in A minor. It is really beautiful, and fun to play. The International/Gingold edition has Wieniawski cadenzas!
There are other Rode concertos, not to mention all of the Kreutzer and Spohr concertos, about a million, I believe, that you could work into the earlier stages of your concerto list.
From Maura Gerety
Posted on December 22, 2006 at 03:12 AM
"Huber" or "Hubay"?
From Anne Horvath
Posted on December 22, 2006 at 03:13 AM
Adolf Huber. Hubay is a whole other story...
Carl Fisher publishes the Huber pieces. They are very nice for students.
From Maura Gerety
Posted on December 22, 2006 at 03:17 AM
Aha, didn't realize there was another guy named Huber. :) I know that Hubay's name was originally Eugen Huber, then he got patriotic and changed it to Hubay Jenö. :)

On the subject of Hubay, anyone know where I can find the sheet music to his "Scenes de la Csárdá"? I have one of them (xeroxed Joska Szigeti's copy in a library!) but I've not been able to find any others.

From Christina Wilke
Posted on December 22, 2006 at 03:26 AM
I didn't know there was a "Huber" out there, especially since that's my mother's maiden name....

Excellent list, it's very well thought out and organized. I'm very impressed with the selections.

From George Philips
Posted on December 22, 2006 at 03:39 AM
Maura, he wrote quite a few. Which one are you looking for? I would suggest getting in touch with Charles Castleman, who is a Hubay expert and has quite a few of them.


Also, what about the Schubert-Ernst "Erlkonig" transcription for solo violin? That's a beast if I've ever seen one.
Cheers!

From Maura Gerety
Posted on December 22, 2006 at 03:42 AM
I just can't even figure out if the sheet music is still in print. I tried Editio Musica Budapest but they didn't have any of them...
From Jubin Matloubieh
Posted on December 24, 2006 at 08:12 PM
Anne, I could actually use imput similar to that. I never studied the most basic of violin repertoire, so I lack greatg knowledge in that area. If you or anyone else could help me place the student concertos, that would be great.

George, where would you place the Ernst transcription?

From George Philips
Posted on December 24, 2006 at 09:06 PM
I'd put it around 12, mainly due to its awkwardness, and the horrendous double-stop with artificial harmonics section in the middle. You can seriously injure your hand playing this piece, if you don't stretch for the octaves properly.
From Will Burgess
Posted on December 25, 2006 at 12:20 PM
Jubin, in the Solo repertoire you really should include all 12 of the Telemann Fantasias! They are a lot of fun to play, and are of varying degrees of difficulty. Also some, if not all, are a good preparation for the Bach S&P
From Maura Gerety
Posted on December 25, 2006 at 03:55 PM
Are the Biber Rosary Sonatas enough of the standard repertoire that they should be included?
From Alex Shiozaki
Posted on December 25, 2006 at 05:47 PM
Having played Dvorak, Tchaikovsky, Shostakovich, and Sibelius--one after another--I would put the Dvorak at the top in terms of difficulty. In pure technical terms, it has the most difficult last mvt, with Sibelius following very close behind. The first mvt, too, requires incredible clarity in order to sound any good. (Shostakovich, on the other hand, is often just hacked away at--I recoiled when I heard Sonnenberg's recording with Maxim Shostakovich.) And while this has nothing to do with difficulty, there is no equal to the second mvt in terms of beauty.

Of course this is all very subjective. I've always found Dvorak a bit awkward to play--it just doesn't seem to fit my hand.

From Maura Gerety
Posted on December 25, 2006 at 07:12 PM
Cripes...is there something very strange about me? I can get my hands around Dvorak without an excessive amount of angst (not saying it's EASY though...), but if I tried Tchaik or Sibelius or Shosti, my fingers would probably fall off. Or am I overestimating their difficulty?
From Alex Shiozaki
Posted on December 26, 2006 at 04:47 AM
I know that I had definitely overestimated their difficulty, and I was pleasantly surprised to find that, technically at least, I've seen worse.

But again, I don't seem to be a Dvorak person. (Symphony No. 8 = Awkward! "American" quartet = Awkward! Violin concerto = Ahhh!) Shostakovich, on the other hand, makes perfect sense to me.

Still, I think Dvorak should be ranked alongside the other three.

From Maura Gerety
Posted on December 26, 2006 at 05:10 AM
Yeah, I guess I am just a Dvorak person then, I had no real troubles with the 8th sym. or the American quartet. :) I try to get my hands aroung Paganini though, and ugggghhhhhh!
From Jubin Matloubieh
Posted on December 26, 2006 at 03:59 PM
George, thanks.

Will, I forgot about those. Because of your comment, I had to clean out and reorganize my music library in order to find them.

Maura, are those for violin solo or violin/orchestra, because I am not adding the violin/piano repertoire yet?

Alex and Maura, I have difficulty even trying to play the Dvorak, Tchaikovsky, Sibelius, or even Mendelssohn or Bruch concerti (I know, Bruch). But, the concerti of Shostakovich, Prokofiev, Khachaturian, and even Berg fall on my fingers decently. I am taking the relative difficulty from input from a large number of musicians, not us few who have trouble with the oddest of things.

From Jubin Matloubieh
Posted on December 26, 2006 at 04:23 PM
Hi everyone,

Happy Holidays!!!

Can anyone help with the placement of the following composers' concerti:
-Vieuxtemps
-Seitz
-Reiding
-Rode
-Huber
-Hubay
-anything not on my list
-any other student concerti

Thanks,
-Jubin

From Amy F.
Posted on December 26, 2006 at 08:09 PM
I would definitely place Britten violin concerto in the top level of difficulty. Technically, it's got spots that are much nastier than Bartok 2.
From Eunice Kim
Posted on December 27, 2006 at 04:02 AM
that looks incredibly well thought out. i think i'd agree with most of what is on your list.

good luck!

From Jubin Matloubieh
Posted on December 28, 2006 at 04:27 AM
Amy, I was thinking about that. I have the same issue with the Berg, but the Britten is a larger issue.

Eunice, thanks.

From Jubin Matloubieh
Posted on December 30, 2006 at 04:55 AM
Ok everyone, someone suggested to me that I make two lists, one for musical difficulty and one for technical difficulty. Any other suggestions of the type? This will take me forever, though.
From Willie M
Posted on February 19, 2007 at 03:58 AM
Jubin, another piece you could put at level 13 is the rozsa violin concerto. It is both difficult technically and musically.
From Vince V.
Posted on February 19, 2007 at 06:29 AM
Prokofiev 2 I think is g minor.

Glad you put B flat major Mozart up there -- I think it's quite difficult.

V

From JOhn kim
Posted on January 8, 2008 at 04:23 AM
paganini wrote SIX concertos?!?!?! O.o
I only know #1 and #2...
From sharelle taylor
Posted on January 8, 2008 at 05:51 AM
How about Handel sonatas?
From Kim Smyth
Posted on January 9, 2008 at 06:04 PM
Where would Spohr 8 fit in?

I also didn't know Paganini wrote 6!!

From Joe Fischer
Posted on January 9, 2008 at 06:37 PM
Paganini's 6th was published after he croaked.
From Andrew Riching
Posted on January 9, 2008 at 11:59 PM
Seeing as you placed most of the caprices and Nel Cor under level 12... I think you need to rethink your placement of God Save the King... it's definitely harder than the caprices...
From Nicole Stacy
Posted on January 28, 2008 at 04:14 AM
I have no criticism for your list, but a few thoughts...I wonder if it is easier to play the Barber with depth than it is to play any Paganini in a really fresh and compelling way?

On the other hand, somebody posted a comment to a young violinist's Paganini caprices on Youtube saying, roughly, "go back to something easier like the Saint-Saens Concerto." I don't know about the rest of you, but that one gave me a beastly time and I think it requires far more stamina than your typical quick, gratuitous showpiece.

From Pieter Viljoen
Posted on January 28, 2008 at 05:03 AM
.
From will l
Posted on June 8, 2008 at 04:16 AM
Dude. Awesome Job!!! Man, I love this. But Waxman Carmen Fantasy is Really Hard. Might Wana Consider moving it down a few levels. Listen to Sergey play it on youtube.
From will l
Posted on June 8, 2008 at 04:18 AM
tchaikovsky is not in the same league as beethoven. no doubt.
From Seph Hutchings
Posted on June 8, 2008 at 04:55 AM
Howdy! I've got a few questions...

Do the levels of the orchestra stuff correspond to the levels of the solo stuff? i.e. can someone reasonably play level 8 solo pieces if they can play level 8 accompanied pieces and vice versa?

I had no idea the Beethoven was so hard! That makes me quite sad. What is it that's so hard about this concerto that puts it above the Barber, the two Carmens, Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso, etc.?

Lastly, which of the level 4 concertos do people here prefer (musically)? I've never heard any of them.

Thanks.

P.S. I didn't see Zigeunerweisen (or I'm blind).

From carlos majlis
Posted on June 8, 2008 at 03:41 PM
I´m not a violinist, but IMHO at level 14
you should put the horrible Boris Tischenko
second v.c. and the Christostov Bulgarian
caprices for solo violin.
From Bernadette Hawes
Posted on June 8, 2008 at 09:29 PM
Jubin,
THANKS for all the hard work! As a newbie who's only just got a foot on the first rung of a ladder that seems to stretch to heaven and beyond (done Rieding's Concerto in B minor), this kind of a list excites my imagination. I'm dying to get a peek at the next work on the list in the hope that it will be just a little out of reach but manageable with a decent amount of hard work. That's if I can get hold of the sheet music.
Thanks for all the hard work. You do set yourself some interesting challenges!
From Jennifer Laursen
Posted on June 9, 2008 at 02:56 PM
Jubin,
Looking at your list I had just a couple of thoughts. First, sometimes it is a good strategy to work on certain pieces together because they present different challenges or together they prepare the player for something really challenging to come. Not that you need to complicate your list, but it would be interesting to present an example of a first year grouping, a second year grouping etc.... You could get an idea of what teachers have done in this regard by asking for folks to contribute their repertoire lists with dates of first performance. One example I can think of is Viotti # 22, which introduces up-bow staccato and the "Wieniawski" bowings. Together with Tchaikovsky Opus 42 "Three pieces" where the entire second movement is spicatto and the third movement introduces collet, these two pieces prepare a student to play the Wieniawski F# minor concerto the following year. Another example is the Paganini caprice # 6 used to prepare a student for the Devil's Trill Sonata (Tartini).

Also, I noticed that the Devil's Trill Sonata is not on your list. Other pieces I didn't see: The Vivaldi Double Concerto, the Locatelli violin sonatas (for two violins), and the Handel Sonatas.

From Ben Clapton
Posted on June 10, 2008 at 12:41 AM
Hi Jennifer,
You might be interested in the book 10 ans avec le violon - it's a french book (i think published by the paris conservetoire), which suggests pieces for the first 10 years of learning the instrument. Now I'm not sure how they decided that, but the 10th year pieces are very much advanced.
The great thing about the book is that is has technique, Violin solo, violin and piano, violin and orchestra, and chamber music (2 violins, 3-4 violins, violin and other instruments). What a fantastic resource.
I found this site here has it for 19 euros: http://www.cite-musique.fr/francais/services/boutique/resultat.asp?MenuItem=0206&CurrentPage=3&TexteRecherche=
it's a french site, but hopefully you'll be able to find your way around it. The book is also in French (and has a tendency to recommend more french works that might appear on other lists), but it's very easy to follow.
From Jennifer Laursen
Posted on June 10, 2008 at 11:37 AM
Thanks, Ben! I will definitely look into this book!
From Martin Butler
Posted on June 11, 2008 at 01:12 AM
I kinda of compiled a list based around my teaching in Australia. The list is based on the Australian Music Exams Board and represents most of the recurring pieces that make it on to the manual list each year - and can be used with the pieces that are published in the series books (now in their 8th edition).

It contains a lot of my favourite pieces (which include the excellent Concertinos series from Bosworth). I make up a folder for each grade so that I always have a wide selection of pieces to select from for students at their approximate grade level. The following list is not exhaustive (although rather large) and the lack of pieces in the earlier grades is because I don't have many beginner students at the moment.

Here goes;

VIOLIN REPERTOIRE

Grade 1

Wohlfahrt 60 Studies Op 45 Bk 1 1,2,3,4
Wohlfahrt 40 Studies Op 54 Bk 1 1,2,5
Kuchler Concertino in G Op. 11 Ist move.

Grade 2

Carse Progressive Studies 9,12
Wohlfahrt Studies Op 45 Bk 16,7,15,17,20
Wohlfahrt Studies Op 54 Bk 1 32
Yanshinov Concertino in Russian Style
Rieding Concertino in Bm Op35 Ist movement

Grade 3

Kayser Studies Op.20 No.7
Wohlfahrt 60 Studies Op 45 Bk 1 22,30,31,32,33,35,44
Nelson Moving Up Again :
Skye Boat Song, Caprice, Jumping Jack
Stone Eight Pieces in Third Position Pastorale, Intermezzo
Bohm Moto Perpetuo
Kuchler Concertino in D Op.15 Ist movement
Millies Concertino in Style of Mozart
Portnoff Russian Fantasia no2.
Portnoff Russian Fantasia no3.

Grade 4

Kayser Studies Op.20 9,13
Kreutzer 42 Studies 2,3,(5)
Mazas Studies Op.36 2,3,10
Wohlfahrt 60 Studies Op 45 Bk 2 38.39.57
Handel Sonata in F op1 #12 HWV370 Ist and 2nd movements
Haydn Serenade from String Q'tet
Kreisler Liebesleid
Martini Gavotte in A
Pleyel Sonatina Op.48 #1
Vivaldi Concerto in A minor 1st or 3rd movements
Rieding Concerto in Hungarian Style Op.21
Seitz Student's Concerto in G Op.13

Grade 5

Kayser Studies Op.20 (bk 1&2) 12,14,16,17,24
Kreutzer 42 Studies (5),6
Mazas Studies Op.36 6,8,9,15,21.
Wohlfahrt StudiesOp45Bk 2 43,47,49,54.
Corelli Sonata in F Op.5 #10
Corelli Sonata in F Op.5 #11
Handel Sonata in E Op1 #15 HWV373 Ist&2nd move.
Verancini Gigue
Vivaldi Concerto in G minor op.12#1 1st or 3rd movements
Dvorak Humoresque mod.difficult version with some double stops
Paradis Sicilienne
Ten Have Bolero Op.11
Wienawski Kujawiak
Beethoven/Kreisler Rondino in Eb
Komarovsky Concerto #2 Ist move.
Kreisler Liebeslied
Mlynarski Mazurka in G Op.7#1
Grade 6
Kayser Studies Op.20 bk 3 27,28,29,31,33.
Kreutzer 42 Studies 8,10,11,13,15,16.
Mazas Studies Op.36 26,28,37,39,41,42.
Corelli Sonata in C Op.5 #3
Fiocco Allegro
Handel Sonata in F Op.1 #12 HWV370 3rd and 4th Movements
Handel Sonata in A Op. 1 #5
Telemann 12 Fantasias for Solo Vln #10
Achron Hebrew Melody
Drdla Souvenir
Elgar Chanson de Nuit
Elgar Chanson de Matin
Gluck Melodie
Kreisler Schon Rosmarin
Massenet Meditation
Porpora/Kreisler Minuet
Seitz Student Concerto Op 15 #4 Finale
V-Williams Fantasia on Greensleeves
Wieniawski Chanson Polonaise
Wieniawski Obertass Mazurka
Hubay Bolero Op.51#3
Monti Czardas
Nielsen Romance
Schubert Sonatina in Am/D Finales
Svendsem Romance

Grade 7

Fiorillo 36 Caprices 11,12,13,19,31
Kayser Studies Op.20 30,32,34,35
Kreutzer 42 Studies 12,14,17,20,21,24,37
Mazas Studies Op.36 45,50,51,53
Bach Sonata in G BWV 1021 1st & 2nd move.
Bach Sonata in A BWV 1015 3rd & 4th move.
Bach Concerto in A minor 1st movement
Handel Sonata in A Op1 #3 HWV361 1st & 2nd move.
Handel Sonata in D Op1. #13 HWV371 1st & 2nd move.
Haydn Concerto in G 1st or 2nd & 3rd movements
Kreutzer Concerto in D #13 1st movement
Mozart Concerto in Bb K207 Finale
Telemann 12 Fantasiasfor Solo Vln#9
Viotti Concerto in A minor 1st mvmt.
Viotti Concerto in G #23 1st or 3rd mvmts.
Accolay Concertino in Am 1st mvmt
Dancla Six Aires Varies Op 118 #'s 3,4
Francouer/Kreisler Siciliano and Rigaudon
Glazunov/Kreisler Serenade Espagnole
Paganini Cantabile
Raff Cavatina op85 #3
Rode Concerto #7 in A minor Finale
Sarasate Spanish Dances Playera
Ten Have Allegro Brilliante
Wieniawski Concerto in Dm 2nd Mvmt.
Mlynarski 2nd Mazurka opus 7
Stravinsky Chanson Russe

Grade 8

Don’t Etudes and Caprices op.35 2,3,5,13
Fiorillo 36 Caprices 26,28,29
Kreutzer 42 Studies 26,30,34,35,38
Rode 24 Caprices 1,2,4,5,6,8,9,15,21,22,24
Corelli Sonata in F Op 5 #4 1st,2nd and 3rd Mvmts.
Haydn Concerto in A 1st movmt (Henle)
Leclair Sonata in D #3 any 2 movements
Mozart Concerto in Bb #1 1st movement
Mozart Concerto in D #2 1st movement
Mozart Concerto in G #3 1st movement
Nardini Sonata in D 1st movement
Rode Concerto #8 in E minor 1st movmt.
Telemann 12 Fantasias for Solo Vln #1,#5.
Veracini Concert Sonata in E minor Ritornello & Allegro con fuoco
Vivaldi Sonata in Am op.2 #12 1st 2 movts.
Beetohoven Romances N0.1 in G op.40 No. 2 in F Op.50
Brahms Sonatensatz
Hubay Hejre Kati Bosworth Ed.
Kreisler Liebesfreud
Kreisler Praeludium and Allegro
Spohr Concerto #8 in A minor Up to Andante
Svendsen Romance
Tartini/Kreisler Variations on a Theme of Corelli
Vieuxtemps Reverie Op.23 #3
Wienawski Legende
Bartok Rumanian Folk Dances All movements except #3
Ries Perpetuum Mobile
Shostakovich Three Fantastic Dances 2,3
Poliakin The Canary
Suk Four Pieces Op. 17 #1 Quasi Ballata;#3 Un Poco Triste

From Aurora Mendez
Posted on June 19, 2008 at 01:48 AM
Your list is off,

there is nooo way that The seitz G minor concerto can come before the Accolay.

Staccato volante! Hellooo!

From Drew Hatfield
Posted on July 17, 2008 at 03:46 AM
Wow, that probabaly took quite a lot of time to think out. It looks very accurate. I have only one comment. I thought the Elgar concerto was one of the most difficult I've ever seen (comparable to the first Wieniawski). Because it is sooo long and incredibly difficult in both technique and musicallity, I would move it up a little. I admit, however, that I have not studied it, so someone may know better than I do.
From carlos santana
Posted on August 1, 2008 at 04:53 AM
i played the sibelius 1st and 3rd mvts for a chamber violinist professional and she suggested that i work on stravinsky but im not sure if playing stravinsky next to sibelius is right.
From carlos santana
Posted on August 1, 2008 at 05:06 AM
walton i would put it as a level 12 if not 13+ however level 13 seems to be cut out for the weird sounding monsters like schoenberg etc. and walton is normal just like sibelius or brahms. but walton is a torture for any1 it just has a lot of passages only for the chosen few.
From will l
Posted on December 29, 2008 at 02:03 AM

i was wondering where Beethoven's triple concerto (violin part) would fall under Jubin's repertoire? pleaz respond. thnx.

From Vinh Valentine
Posted on June 7, 2010 at 08:07 PM

 This a great list.  Awesome!

From Corey Worley
Posted on June 8, 2010 at 03:02 AM

Are you sure you would put Bruch in g minor and Khatchaturian in the same level? The first mov. of the bruch is a LOT more easier than any mov. of the Katchaturian. The Cadenza of the Katchaturian is wicked stuff too. The third mov. of the Bruch may come a little closer to Khatchaturian...but still....there are some MAJOR future problematic areas of the Khatchaturian. Lets not forget, I have to say putting Khatchaturia with an orchestra is a heck of a lot easier than the Bruch. But for the most part, I love the list. You must have VERY talented students in order to perform these :D

From Simon Streuff
Posted on January 29, 2012 at 02:29 PM
These lists are...uncomplete as they are... awesome!

Would love to see the Schumann Violin Concerto d-minor somewhere. The third Movement has some crazy scales, the first movement has some dezime-double-stop-trills. I would put that concerto somewhere between Mendelssohn and the Paganini VCs.
But honestly: As awesome as those lists are, there are no Grades and progression technically. If you have a good technique you can not only play the difficult pieces better but also the "easy" pieces sound different and get a new aspect to them. And for example if you can play Ernst Last rose, or the etudes technically, it doesn't mean that you can play everything above with ease too. Every music has its own difficulties and its very personal, what is easy for someone and what is difficult.
But still, lists like this are a great help to chose repertoire for you and your students! I haven't played a quarter of it, but I know almost all from listening to competitions and stuff. We violinists have a good time chosing from that rich repertoire. And this is as we all know not even the "complete" list of concertos and etudes.

From Trevor Jennings
Posted on January 29, 2012 at 05:39 PM
There appears to be a typo in the second level listing where it says "Vivaldi: Concerto in A minor, Op. 2 No. 8".
I think this should be Vivaldi Op. 3 No. 6, which is in Suzuki Book 4 (although there with a few small departures from the original, probably for pedagogical reasons).
Vivaldi's Op. 2 No. 8 is a sonata in G major for violin and bass.
From Vish Shaddarsanam
Posted on February 26, 2013 at 02:25 AM
this is a nice list, except I feel the Bach E major concerto should not be placed in the same level of difficulty as the A minor. The E major is far more difficult
From Richard Saw
Posted on February 14, 2014 at 03:25 AM
Martin Butler: Thanks for the interesting list.

I am adult learner following ABRSM syllabus which should be similiar to AMEB exam in Au.

But I found you list DONT and Fiorillo etudes at higher grades. In my city, student barely finish Kayser even at grade 8 ABRSM. Kreutzer etude No 30 is in exam list of Grade 8 ABRSM. But rarely people do that. Are dont, Fiorillo and Rode 24 caprices (Rode is known to be very difficult) a needed for actual exam? In fact, my teacher told me that, in terms of etude, he reached Fiorillo level which may means that Rode caprices are far beyond even with teacher's capcacity. What is the standing of a teacher who has technical capcity to Fiorillo etudes generally?


What makes an elite violinist?

Sarah Chang Our interview with Sarah Chang is one of more than two dozen in The Violinist.com Interviews: Volume 1, which also features talks with Joshua Bell, Maxim Vengerov, and David Garrett, as well as a foreword by Hilary Hahn.

Get it now! For Kindle | For iBooks | In Paperback

Lady Victory

International Violin Competition of Indianapolis

Violinist.com editor Laurie Niles is in Indianapolis for our daily coverage of the ninth quadrennial international violin competition.