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Rosin

Instruments: What kind of rosin??

From Angela H
Posted September 26, 2006 at 02:34 PM

My bow hair is starting to turn yellow and I was wondering if that was from the rosin. I use a cheap rosin that I got two years ago when I had a rental violin. Ive looked at getting new rosin but im not sure what kind...does anyone have any suggestions?

From Kurt Stein
Posted on September 26, 2006 at 04:07 PM
I think that the oil from your skin [and hands especially] will really cause your bow hair to yellow. While you may need newer rosin, I am willing to wager that it is about time for your bow to be rehaired also.

As far as rosins, I used to use Salchow, but I am really starting to like the Andrea rosin based on the "improved" Tartini formula. I hear good things about Motrya, too. Of these, the Salchow is probably the least expensive; rosin always lasts a while anyway, so $10 versus $20 shouldn't matter too much over the course of a year or so.

From Richard Hellinger
Posted on September 26, 2006 at 09:23 PM
my bowhair is also a yellowish/offwhite color (because I opted for the offwhite/yellowish bow hair when I re-haried...) but on my bow i have about 2 inches near the frog where the rosin is junked up and it is un playable... will it need to be rehaired or is there a way to clean it?
From parmeeta bhogal
Posted on September 27, 2006 at 09:34 AM
On the strength of Bury's experience I bought the (Millaut) Collophone Gold & Silver and have been very pleased with price and performance.
From N.A. Mohr
Posted on September 27, 2006 at 02:31 PM
I've noticed that the expensive rosins really are better than the cheap rosins...but beyond a certain point you're likely only paying for the name...

...LOL, having said that, I'm currently using the Liebenzeller Gold III...love the stuff!

From Ihnsouk Guim
Posted on September 29, 2006 at 11:50 PM
Richard - I think you can clean the rosin off the bow. I don't know how but when my daughter's violin comes back from the luthier rosin buildup near the frog is always gone.
From Richard Hellinger
Posted on September 30, 2006 at 12:28 AM
ok... Ill contact my luthier and ask...
Thanks,
Richard
From N.A. Mohr
Posted on September 30, 2006 at 02:15 AM
...you can do it all yourself...there are different ways but this works well...

...take off frog so hair is off...wash carefully with warm water and just enough dish soap to get it clean...

...rinse WELL with clean warm water...

...pat hair dry...reattach frog and tighten just barely enough so hair dries straight...

...let dry completely (make sure you place the bow in a 'good' place...not too hot...not too cold)...

Once hair is completely dry...rosin as if it were a new bow...

Note: Do NOT get water into the tip OR the frog - the wood may swell, crack, or the glue may come loose...it's not hard to keep dry...as long as you're careful...

From Angelo Eftimeo
Posted on October 3, 2006 at 03:46 PM
The method I use for cleaning hair and drying it similar but I use denatured alcohol, while this cleans the rosinn off faster and easier, it is even more important to not let the damp hair touch the bow wood. It can cause immediate damage to the varnish is the main problem. By using an empty box taller than the bow you can remove any potential problems with this. After cleaning the bow (and it might take 2 applications depending on level of caked/accumilated rosin), set the bow in the box with the hair/loose frog on the outside (button end down so that the bow rests on the inside of the tip). This allows the hair to dry easily without any chance of the damp hair touching the wood section of the bow. We clean between 12-15 bows per week and this method saves our bows as well as making the job easy.

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