Real Joseph Klotz?

September 9, 2016 at 12:49 AM · I recently came across a violin labeled "Joseph Klots in Mittenwalde anno 1795", just like the real ones online. At our school we have old violins they don't need and I asked to be given one for an art project.

I brought it home and looked it up and realized they can go for a bit of good money when they're in decent shape. Mine however is not in decent shape with splits and cracks but I want to know the authenticity of it. Is it a real Joseph Klotz and would it be worth any money if it was in good condition? Can I get it fixed?

Replies (4)

September 9, 2016 at 01:33 AM · The lower bouts look too wide and the varnish too dark for it to be an authentic Klotz, but I am not a luthier, so let's see what they say. :)

September 9, 2016 at 01:52 AM · Looks like a fake made around 1900, not worth much with all the cracks.

It will probably end up being worth about as much as it costs to repair. Unless it has a soundpost crack in which case it is not worth anything.

September 9, 2016 at 02:43 AM · FYI there are loads of those Joseph Klotz 1795 labels around. I'm sure one or two of them might be in actual Klotzes....

September 9, 2016 at 03:37 AM · Amanda, Lyndon Taylor knows what he is talking about as he sees these kinds of violins on a regular basis and is a repairer and dealer of antique violins.

There is no way that your violin is an authentic Joseph Klotz.

But if you want to remove all doubt take some good pictures of the violin as for example shown in this thread :

The Klotz family worked in Mittenwald and followed the local method of violin construction. For example their rib construction used a single piece of wood across the bottom part of the violin.

Your violin likely has two pieces of rib coming together at the middle below the saddle showing a seam. If so Mittenwald is very unlikely. There are many other features as well that need to be present to even consider this to be from Mittenwald let alone from the Klotz family.

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