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Questions about Violin Stands. Violin stands anyone?

Violinists: Recordings and Performances: I really need some information and ideas for my violin stand that I am going to design. All of you guys are violinist and I am sure you will have the best opinions and comments I can get from this survey. Thank you

From Arvin Wong
Posted February 27, 2011 at 04:47 AM

Hi everyone, I am currently doing a Design and Technology coursework and I am designing a violin stand since I saw that there's only a few varieties of violin stands in the market. An essential part of my coursework is to do a survey on my targeted customers.

I am actually surprised by how small the range of violin stands in the market is, contrasting to guitar stands which I found a whole load of them on google. Anyway, I really want to make this violin stand the best it could be but I need some information and comments from you guys so I can know how I can design my violin stand. I would really, really appreciate you if you can take your precious time to finish my following survey. Thank you very much.

Here's some of the current violin stands in the market, I numbered them so you can refer to them in the answer easier. 

(1)

(2)

(3)

(4)

 

(5)

 

 

Questions:

  1. Do you have a violin stand? If yes, why did you buy it?
  2. Do you see a need or a gap for violin stand? Why?
  3. Do you store your violin in its case because you think it's the safest place to store it?
  4. What will be the reason for you buying a violin stand?
  5. What style you want your violin stand to be in? (modern, classic, vintage,etc)
  6. Do you want any other special features for your violin stand? (hold your bow, rosin, etc)
  7. Choose the violin stand from above which you would like your violin to be held in that way. (No. 1-5)
  8. Rank the violin stands from above in terms of how safe you think the violin is when it's held by the stand. (the safest first, the dangerous last)
  9. Which violin stand is generally more appealing to you? (style, way of holding the violin, shape,etc)
  10. How much are you willing to pay for a decent violin stand?
  11. Any additional comments from you guys will be great : ] 

Thank you very much for completing my survey. I really do thank you. 

 

 

From Evan Garey
Posted on February 27, 2011 at 05:19 AM

Hmmm-- if I could design a perfect violin stand, it would be simple, light weight and hold the violin securely, but fold up flat for easy transport.

Mag-Lev! Violin mysteriously floats in a magnetic field suspended between a 3-part frame. Disassembly would involve reversing the polarity of the frame so it folds up securely. I'll buy one! 

From Roland Garrison
Posted on February 27, 2011 at 08:07 AM

Instead of answering your survey, let me tell you a bit about myself.

I play for my own pleasure, and do not use my violin for my income. I have spent an amount on the violin relative to what I would spend on top-of the-line electronic entertainment.

That said, I feel a relationship with my violins. I would not place them in any device considered a holder unless I felt it was as safe or safer than their case. I currently store them on a cabinet  I made; it is open, but the wood shelf they are on is not finished, and it is located in a spot where there is no risk of them falling.

I think safety over looks would be the critical component of any stand I would consider.

From Julian Stokes
Posted on February 27, 2011 at 08:30 AM

Here we go: Imagine these questions answered in the voice of Daffy Duck:
(for literal minded readers - what follows is a (somewhat lame) attepmt of humour)
 

  1. Do you have a violin stand? If yes, why did you buy it?
    No
  2. Do you see a need or a gap for violin stand? Why?
    No
  3. Do you store your violin in its case because you think it's the safest place to store it?
    Yes. I'm sure it is. Light ages wood. There are other environmental factors. In its case it is in a protected environment where it can't get knocked over, crushed or scratched. Also you can't spill things on it.
  4. What will be the reason for you buying a violin stand?
    I would never buy one. Unless to set up for target practice.
  5. What style you want your violin stand to be in? (modern, classic, vintage,etc)
    I said I don't want one!
  6. Do you want any other special features for your violin stand? (hold your bow, rosin, etc)
    ENOUGH ALREADY! I DO NOT WANT A VIOLIN STAND.
  7. Choose the violin stand from above which you would like your violin to be held in that way. (No. 1-5)
    LISTEN BUSTER- FOR PITY'S SAKE - HOW MANY TIMES? You put you violin on a stand if you want. Mine goes in its case.
  8. Rank the violin stands from above in terms of how safe you think the violin is when it's held by the stand. (the safest first, the dangerous last)
    The worst is Number 4.
  9. Which violin stand is generally more appealing to you? (style, way of holding the violin, shape,etc)
    NONE OF THEM.
    I DO NOT LIKE THE VIOLIN STAND.
    I DO NOT WANT ONE, SAM I AM
    .
  10. How much are you willing to pay for a decent violin stand?
    !**@CK - that'll be nothing. See earlier answers.
  11. Any additional comments from you guys will be great : ]

 

From Arvin Wong
Posted on February 27, 2011 at 09:04 AM

Thanks for the reponses. This really helps.

Anyway, Mr. Stokes, can you briefly say why you wouldn't want it?

 

From Ruth Brons
Posted on February 27, 2011 at 02:34 PM

Violin stands are used primarily by retailers.

From Robert Cunnah
Posted on February 27, 2011 at 08:15 PM

I use number 5, it works fine for the violin, not so good for the bow which end up in the case. A stand is good when practicing, so you have a secure place to hold the fiddle while you write notes or take a quick break. Some times I use two violins that have different set ups, so a stand is useful for a quick change. Probably the case is always the safest and I always use the case if I leave a violin unattended. That's my two cents.

From Michael Pijoan
Posted on February 27, 2011 at 09:51 PM

 Violin stand = bad

Violin case = good

From James Kramer
Posted on February 27, 2011 at 09:55 PM

 I use #3 and it works great, both for my viola and my wife's violin. I just keep a small tupperware container next to the stand for any miscellaneous items like rosin. 

From Allan Green
Posted on February 27, 2011 at 10:51 PM

 Questions:

  1. I wanted something secure to quickly hold the instrument during breaks whilst practising.
  2. Mine fullfils its function but there aren't many about. 
  3. Overnight it lives in its case but during the day I keep it on the stand.
  4. See 1.
  5. I don't mind as long as form follows function and it is well made. Beauty will normally follow...!
  6. A secure bow stand. Bows are expensive and fragile too. 
  7. No 5 (I own one)
  8. 5, 3, 1, 4, 2
  9. Aesthetically I like No. 4 though I think it lacks support. 
  10. Depends on what it is made from and how it is constructed. Several bits of tubular steel would be a lot less valuable than a solid wood stand. 
  11. Good luck with your research. If possible please keep us updated. 

 

 

From Evan Garey
Posted on February 28, 2011 at 12:31 AM

OK-- here's my revised suggestion, incorporating those who insist a case is the ONLY option: Design a violin case that when empty, can stand on its wide end and is stable (via folding tripod?) and arms fold out to hold the violin securely. When done, it folds back up into a violin case. Now THIS pleases both camps :-) Remember, you heard it here first.

From Roland Garrison
Posted on February 28, 2011 at 06:16 AM

Here's an interesting engineering challenge for you. Create a violin stand that meets the requirements below:

  • Fits in a traditional violin case, with the violin.
  • Functions as a sleeve for the violin while in the case, but can be self-supporting outside the case
  • Does not require the stand to be removed or modified if there is a typical chinrest on the violin
  • When in use without the case, it holds the violin far enough from the floor that low lying 'dust bunnies' or 'hall ground effect' will have any effect on the instrument (it can be distance, or a protective layer)
  • It is quickly and easily removable from the instrument for playing
  • It has a clear face that protects the instrument from traditional light sources, so it can also be used to display the instrument

If you cannot meet all the criteria, see how many you can!

From sharelle taylor
Posted on February 28, 2011 at 09:56 PM

 I use the string swinger all the time, I have a wall that doesn't get passing traffic & in the darker part of the corner, the violin is completely secure (barring earthquake), and I cover it with a cloth when I finish playing (I made a large isosceles  triangle and tied a knot at the apex, and that just sits over the top of the scroll and drapes down).  Since I use a shoulder rest !, it is quicker if the violin is set up and ready to play each time.  With those new wittner geared pegs, it doesn't lose its tuning if left out either.

but i like stand 1 (the modern carved one)

From Roland Garrison
Posted on March 1, 2011 at 12:40 AM

If the hanger is a wall hanger, I think it should have some sort of holder for the bottom also. I would imagine something like the feet on a shoulder rest.

If the top is supported, and is supporting the main weight, and the body is secured, then the next thing would be physical security; possibly for higher traffic areas, a plexiglas door? I picture something like the following:
http://www.globalplastics.ca/cd2846.jpg

From Mendy Smith
Posted on March 1, 2011 at 01:30 AM

I don't currently use a stand (I store my instruments in their cases).  However, now that I'm playing & performing chamber music more often and switching between instruments (between viola and violin), a stand that could accomodate either a violin or viola (with bow) would be helpful.  If it also had a way to affix a tuner (or a built in one) even better. 

What would be even better is if it was built into a music stand so that there is one less thing to lug around to rehearsals.  Two instruments, a stand, a bag of music, and all the fixings is a lot to haul around without adding an instrument stand into the mix.

BTW - #4 looks down right scary.  Just think what would happen if the instrument got bumped.

From Arvin Wong
Posted on March 1, 2011 at 10:26 PM

THANKS YOU VERY MUCH!!!! THANKS FOR THE COMMENTS AND IDEAS!!! NOW I CAN START TO DESIGN MY STAND, CHEERS!!

From Charlie Gibbs
Posted on March 3, 2011 at 07:45 PM

I've seen #4 in a music store, but a larger version for cellos.  I personally have a #3, but I only use it if I'm switching back and forth a lot between violin and mandolin (it holds both nicely).  My wife has a scaled-up #3 for her cello.

I bought a bunch of leather straps at a music store; each end has a slit that you can slip over a tuning peg, allowing you to hang the instrument on a wall hook.  This is how I usually store my violin at home.  I hang my guitars and mandolins on the wall the same way; it keeps everything quickly accessible, which encourages frequent use.

I must admit, #1 is awfully pretty.  #2 looks as if it would be cumbersome and insecure.

From Andrew Victor
Posted on March 3, 2011 at 09:19 PM

My main requirement for a stand (and a case) is that it DO NO HARM; if I am careless, I want a stand that will protect my instrument from me.

As far as I'm concerned, No. 4 is the only stand that meets that criterion as long as I'm not too careless. The other designs would appear to allow me to knock the violin over if I grab at it the wrong way. No.4, while not fool proof, will at least provide the same amount of safety on all directions. I have 2 cello stands of this design and I'm very happy with them.

As far as cases are concerned, the latch is a critical component and there are often times when you want to be able to operate it with one hand. You also want it to be located such that if you are a bit careless when removing or replacing your violin in the case you do not scratch it on any part of the latch. Finally you want a latch that will hold even if you forget to zip the cloth cover. I think in regard to these criteria, Musafia has the best latches available at this time.

Andy

From Marianne Hansen
Posted on March 4, 2011 at 05:21 PM

I store my fiddle in its case when not in use, and in my house, it is the only safe way to store it.  While practicing, I either set it down flat on a (cleared) table or set it upright in the open case when I take a break.  My case is heavy enough that the support is roughly equivalent to some of the stands shown.  I own one like #4, but find that with the shoulder rest on, the fiddle falls forward in the box and I do not consider it steady enough.  My husband plays with no shoulder rest and he sometimes uses that stand - he likes it.  The little spot for the bow is convenient.

From John Cadd
Posted on March 5, 2011 at 03:41 PM

Many amateur players in orchestras need a safe place to hold the violin during the break.(Break----yes that`s when they get broken ) The one built into , or attached to the normal metal music stand would be a huge bonus. If you wanted one you could attach it yourself.  A low position (near shoes and feet)  in the home would not be needed .So that needs a different calculation. If the violin is out of the case it is more likely to be practiced. Don`t worry about the ones who don`t want one. It takes all sorts.  So always go for stability and physical protection primarily before attractive woods or shapes.  Maybe even a violin ----Case----- holder ( vertical and under the music stand.).There is a market for one.

From Bessie Smith
Posted on November 14, 2012 at 05:33 PM
I guess I shouldn't be surprised to see some confusion here, but any player who does club, restaurant or cabaret work understands the point of a violin stand. It's not for display or home storage, it's to safely hold your instrument at the ready while you break or switch instruments (mandolinist here).

As such, a typical consumer would look for something "un-tippable". If your band mates knock it with their foot or the corner of their gear, it should stay stable and upright. Sudden shocks could be absorbed and the instrument would be supported at least-fragile points.

They'd also look for convenience in the design- how quick and easy is it to get violin and bow in and out of it? Will it hold a violin with unusual dimensions, or with the shoulder rest attached? This turned out to be key for me- I use an unusually high chin rest. I can't use the Ingles stand (#3) because the base grips aren't adjustable. The Peak stand has adjustable grips, but the degree to which they can be adjusted isn't defined in the manufacturer specs...so although I've heard the Hercules stand (#5) isn't as stable- as you can see in the pictures, has very little base support to the instrument- I ended up buying it. The neck grip on it *is* clever- you can stow and retrieve your violin with one hand. As for the rest, we'll see how it goes....

From Stephen Symchych
Posted on November 14, 2012 at 06:15 PM
I have no experience with any of these, but would imagine one would be useful were I to play Bartok's Contrasts again. In that case, speed of entry/exit, safety, and compact design are the main attributes I'd look for. There's no special advantage I can see for a non-modern-looking one. Perhaps a back-to-back double stand so you could put one fiddle down before picking up the other.

Of the ones pictured (I can't see #4), 3 and 5 look most useful.

From Charles Cook
Posted on November 14, 2012 at 11:44 PM
Is there a stand out there that keeps the violin off the ground so it doesn't get kick around like a soccer ball?


From Christopher Payne
Posted on November 15, 2012 at 01:02 AM
Things like this are so alien to classical violinists. A classical violinist will walk offstage and go to a green room or something where they usually put their violin in its case or lay it on some safe surface.
However, the gigging violinist who plays in restaurants and bars will have breaks and need a handy place to put the instrument. I understand the worries of your violin being kicked on a stand but I've not had that problem yet and anyway, you shouldn't be taking your most valuable instrument on gigs where that might happen in the first place.
I use the Hercules (#5) and also the String Wing which attaches to a microphone stand. The Hercules is the best I have tried (I tried a couple of others too) as it is light, folds up neatly enough to put in the case pocket, is durable and has the neat system that locks the neck in place by the weight and then releases when you lift.
Maybe this is the wrong forum to be asking this. You need to ask it on fiddleforum.com, or somewhere like there, where such things are seen as practical and not met with scorn and derision ;) ... Just kidding!
From Sandy Herrault
Posted on November 15, 2012 at 01:29 AM
I use no. 4, only when I'm out performing. Otherwise, I use a string swing which attaches to the wall. I never store my violin in the case because I would be constantly taking it out and putting it away. I would never be able to use a floor stand on a daily basis because I'd be afraid it could topple over. So, stands are in my opinion not the most practical invention, just when I'm at a show, I need to keep things looking neat, and I put the case away.
From Gene Wie
Posted on November 15, 2012 at 02:03 AM
Interesting knee-jerk reactions here...how about backing off on the tunnel vision a bit, people? Just because *you* can't imagine what it might be useful for doesn't deem it irrelevant.

I've used the Hercules stand for pit playing, and have found it very useful. I'm also a woodwind player, and the concept of an instrument stand is not for mere display, but something functional that allows you to switch between different instruments quickly while keeping them safe. In more budget-oriented productions, I have been in situations where I've had to cover violin, clarinet, bass clarinet, alto saxophone, flute, and piccolo, and the stands made it pretty simple to get back and forth while keeping all the instruments fairly safe.

The one thing that I think instrument stands for pit use could incorporate is some reflective material so that it is easily seen so people moving around don't run into it as easily.

From Katherine Moller
Posted on November 15, 2012 at 03:54 AM
I personally use the #5 stand for gigs. I like the fact that it folds up neatly and I love the way it holds the violin in with the weight sensitive grip. I also do on occasion use something like a swing string that attaches to the mic stand but I don't like using it in venues where the audience is close and might trip over the monitors and knock over the mic stands. I own the Ingles #3 as well, but find it cumbersome to take to gigs.
From David Sanderson
Posted on November 15, 2012 at 03:34 PM
I think that the key here is the fragility of the violin and bow. Unless the holder provides enough of the security of a case, for both the instrument and the bow, you're asking for trouble; that's the challenge. Second are the differences in the playing environment for different musicians - what you do for practicing is different from what you do as a Classical ensemble member, and both are different from work as a stage band performer.

I find myself considering the possibilities of an enclosed holder, which might attach to a mike stand or music stand, and would first and foremost protect the instrument and bow from being touched. It might be just a three-sided hood, long enough to protect the full length of the bow, with secure and easy-to-use attachments for the instrument and bow, and padded spacers to keep them from touching the hood. At the extreme the holder should be secure enough to protect the instrument and bow if the stand is knocked over; it is not impossible that the holder should have a cover, which would make it in effect a case, or indeed be a lightweight case used for performances - transfer the equipment needed for the performance from the permanent case to the "holder" case, carry it to the stage and attach to the stand.

This kind of solution is neither as cheap or as maximally convenient as one might wish, but I think that it might have real appeal. An interesting discussion, for sure.

From jean dubuisson
Posted on November 15, 2012 at 04:04 PM
Questions:

1. Do you have a violin stand? If yes, why did you buy it?

Yes, I bought it in a general music store.

2. Do you see a need or a gap for violin stand? Why?

I think a violin stand is very important for children and beginners because seeing the violin readily available encourages them to pick it up spontaneously and begin playing on it regularly. When the violin is locked away in a case somewhere it is much more bother to take it out.

3. Do you store your violin in its case because you think it's the safest place to store it?

It is of course safer in the case, but if the violin stand is in a safe corner somewhere it should be OK. We regularly put our violins on stands in our house and no accidents have occurred.

4. What will be the reason for you buying a violin stand?

See above.

5. What style you want your violin stand to be in? (modern, classic, vintage,etc)

I think a neutral black design but that is personal of course.

6. Do you want any other special features for your violin stand? (hold your bow, rosin, etc)

It is important that the bow can also be held securely. Our current stand does not have that so we just have to put the bow somewhere in between and hope it will not fall over. Rosin is less important, it can easily be placed somewhere readily accessible, in a drawer, or in a little box on a desk.

7. Choose the violin stand from above which you would like your violin to be held in that way. (No. 1-5)

I can't see figure 4, and I can't see how 5 works. No.2 seems strange. Nos. 1 and 3 seem fine.

8. Rank the violin stands from above in terms of how safe you think the violin is when it's held by the stand. (the safest first, the dangerous last)

1 and 3 seem safe, the others seem unclear.

9. Which violin stand is generally more appealing to you? (style, way of holding the violin, shape,etc)

A neutral design like 3 is what I prefer, but not in white color.

10. How much are you willing to pay for a decent violin stand?

I'd say around 40 euros?

From Gene Wie
Posted on November 15, 2012 at 09:25 PM
> Unless the holder provides enough of the
> security of a case, for both the instrument
> and the bow, you're asking for trouble

As it's been mentioned by several posters already, the purpose of these stands is NOT storage. They are used in performance situations where you have to switch instruments quickly and safely, and do not have the room nor the time to use the case (that velcro neck restraint makes a ton of noise when you're a foot away from a microphone!).

From Brian Kelly
Posted on November 16, 2012 at 01:54 AM
Because I use a shoulder rest (grudgingly) then I leave my violin on a shelf in a safe place with the shoulder rest fitted and ready to play. I think this is safer than on the floor. If I did not use a shoulder rest then I would put it back in its case.
I do love the first one though.
From Bessie Smith
Posted on November 16, 2012 at 05:55 AM
David,

I considered a mic or music stand swing clip, but the thought of that terrifies me more than a floor stand. Not only does your violin have further to fall, but the stand supporting it has a higher center of gravity...and is much heavier, so once tipped the stand itself could then fall on the instrument.

I know it seems counter-intuitive to keep your instrument at foot-stomping level, but IMHO it's truly safer there. Any kind of accident or impact that would crush your instrument in a floor stand would *definitely* do worse to an instrument in a swing stand, and that's the truth.

From Paul Deck
Posted on November 16, 2012 at 04:21 PM
I'm excited to see what you come up with for a music stand design. Rather than respond to your survey, which I suspect will garner relatively few responses simply because it is long, here is a list of what I would look for in a violin stand.

(1) I'm actually looking for a stand that I can wall-mount. You seem to be after something that is floor mounted. Can it do both? Maybe have a component that attaches permanently to the wall, and then the stand clips onto that reversibly but securely?
(2) Something that does not put my violin into contact with synthetic materials such as plastic or rubber that might contain plasticizers or other leachable organic compounds that could interact with the varnish on my violin.
(3) Holds instrument securely rather than the violin just sitting on it, so that if the violin is bumped it does not fall out of the stand (if the mount is on the floor it might even be good to have areas where one could put a couple of bricks to make the thing more stable overall.
(4) Needs to hold bow too, and not just hanging/swinging but clipped at both ends. We can put our rosin and mute in our pockets.

Design (5) above looks like it could be combined with a music stand. For a stand that does all of the above, $40 would not be unreasonable.

From John Cadd
Posted on November 16, 2012 at 05:47 PM
I half read the question as a music stand but you could combine both and look at adding a bit of a case as well. Top would hold the music section . Bottom would be the normal stable(?) base and growing in the middle would be a vertical case section. This would suit the amateur orchestras during the tea/chat/social/psyching-out break when violins get broken. "Oh sorry. I just sat on your violin". or "Oh it fell off your chair and I stepped on it ". So the case bit (outline pads etc ) would hold a vertical violin. Not much of a cover but a section that covered the bridge area (there or thereabouts )and also held it still. Far enough off the ground to avoid big feet. A section for a vertical bow alongside the violin. Easy to pick up after you sit down on the chair . A transformer type of music /violin stand. Or just big clips to attach your own case to the music stand .
From Adrian Heath
Posted on November 20, 2012 at 11:00 PM
I would have appreciated a stand when I played 1st viola in Fauré's requiem (original version) when I needed my violin for just one movement; or maybe in Bartok's Contrasts, where you have to alternate a normal violin and a re-tuned one. Perching it (plus the bow) on a chair is not too reassuring!

Otherwise, the case is safer, provided the lid doesn't get nudged by a passing idiot, sending the lock (or the bow clip) through the tender spruce belly..

From Charles Cook
Posted on November 20, 2012 at 11:40 PM
I use a keyboard bench at its highest setting, and lay the violin on it, no case. If I can, I'll place it next to a wall.

http://www.cheapamusic.com.au/store/on-stage-x-style-double-keyboard-bench.html

Its not a perfect set-up, but a least the violin won't be treated like a soccer ball

From John Cadd
Posted on November 21, 2012 at 11:34 AM
Get a loop of string and hang it on the Grand Piano. Let me explain that for you . James Galway the famous flute player had a temporary job,when he was young,in a piano warehouse or factory.He had been fitting something inside a grand piano with a screwdriver. Later that day the boss asked him to take off the For Sale sign hanging on the side of the Grand Piano. It was only then that he realised his screwdriver had driven the screw right through the casing and it was sticking out the side .
Arvin may need to look at violin safety before an attractive design for the stand .
From J Petersen
Posted on December 20, 2012 at 05:33 AM
I don't have a stand, but I wouldn't mind having a violin stand that was somewhat like a pouch that could sit on the floor without tipping but also be hung on a wall. A flap-foot at the back like a picture frame holder (or one in reverse) could add stability while on the floor and fold up (or fold down if it's visually appealing) while on the wall.

The pouch would be lined with something soft to cushion and hold the violin and support the base well enough to hold it securely while still letting you see (and enjoy the aesthetics) of the rest of the instrument.

The back of the "pouch" (which could be wood or leather or a synthetic material) could reach up high enough at the back to echo the curve of a violin (narrower at the top but not as inset as the neck of the violin) and hold a leather or velcro strap to support the neck. It doesn't have to be solid. It could be partially open to reduce weight.

For stability, the base could be done any number of ways, even lion claws, with a tail toward the back or something very simple that could fold into the pouch when being transported.

All the designs at the top of this thread seem sort of "fussy" and insecure to me. Imagine instead a kangaroo baby peeking out from mama's pouch, with her front legs over the edge so you can see her (the violin tailpiece and bridge need not be obscured).


The impulse to grab the instrument and play if you have five minutes free is more likely to be satisfied if the violin is near at hand rather than in a case.

From Nathan Cole
Posted on December 20, 2012 at 06:12 PM
Since I've moved to LA I've become even more careful about the violin being either in my hands or in a case at all times. We were on rehearsal break once and two colleagues saw me in my dressing room, with my violin next to my case but not inside it. They both gasped and said, "Earthquakes!" before ordering me to put it in the case! Many of my colleagues out here have "close call" stories from even minor tremors.

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