Anxiety, Biology, and Playing From the Heart

February 18, 2018, 10:45 PM · This past week brought us Valentine's Day, Ash Wednesday, Lunar New Year, and . . . Heart-Lung Day! I'm teaching at a new elementary school with Science from Scientists, an educational non-profit that brings hands-on science education to schools for grades 3-8. This was only my second time at this school and I was working with a new teaching partner. The school teachers wanted us to do two heart-related activities with the students, "Heart Health," a lesson with blood pressure cuffs and stethoscopes, and "Heart Dissection," which is what it sounds like: dissecting a preserved sheep heart. I'm a biologist, so people might reasonably think that I enjoy dissections. They can be an excellent way to learn anatomy. And yet . . .

In high school Biology class, dissection was traumatic for me. The smell made me sick to my stomach, and I was squeamish about the visuals and the texture. I watched as my lab partner struggled with the bulk of the work, and tried to participate by writing our names on the specimen's identifying tag. A "friend" told me later that my lab partner had been annoyed and complained during the next class period about how little I had done and how I'd written my own name first, and larger, on the tag, even though she'd done all the work.

I was ashamed of my behavior but couldn't do anything about it. The teacher, whom I otherwise loved and admired, made light of it and laughed. At that time in my life, many things felt out of control. I was ambushed by waves of performance anxiety about things that other people seemed to be able to do just fine. There were some narrow avenues of things that I was good at and that didn't make me feel this way, and I concentrated on those and let others go. I let a lot of things go due to anxiety and shame, including public speaking and solo violin performance.

Because she's new I gave my co-teacher a choice of which lesson she wanted to lead. She admitted to being squeamish herself and picked the Heart Health lesson, leaving me with the dissection. In this job, I had assisted with it once before and it went okay, so maybe leading this dissection was another chance for me to conquer some old demons. I didn't view it that way at first--at first I was dreading it, procrastinating preparing because my old companion, the anxiety, was rearing its ugly head. My logical brain reminded me that procrastination would just make everything worse, but even that knowledge wasn't enough to get me going.

What finally did was realizing that it was "just" anxiety, and I'd seen it before. Sure, anxiety can be pretty debilitating, but it is also something that I've been able to cope with in other situations by taking small concrete steps to support myself. I've learned, for example, to keep my hands warm during anxious violin playing situations by wearing fingerless gloves. That makes a tangible difference in how I feel, and how I sound, which leads to a virtuous feedback loop: I feel better, and then I play better.

Anxiety is also something that can be supported and worked through if other people are understanding about it. The education field has come a long way since my Biology teacher laughed and graded students on participation. Now we encourage participation but we explicitly allow students to sit back and observe if they are squeamish. We tell them that the sheep hearts come from animals that are being slaughtered anyway, for food, so we are using specimens that would go to waste otherwise. We let students leave the room if they don't feel well. And we don't grade them or judge them on the dissection; it's a learning experience. What if I'd had that kind of support? Would my attitude towards dissection have been different?

So I made a list of all the things that made me anxious about this experience. The smell came to mind first. I read on the internet that Carolina Biological Supply now has something to preserve specimens called "Carolina's Perfect Solution®," which is supposed to be non-toxic and not require excessive ventilation. And I've used it before, last year: sure, it still smells a little funky, but it doesn't bring to mind the maw of hell. I know I can handle it.

Another anxiety provoker was diagrams like this one, which make my eyes glaze over. Despite the fact that I've seen any number of blue and red diagrams with lots of labels at various levels of detail, I still can't remember which vessel is the aorta, which one is the pulmonary trunk, and which one is the superior vena cava.

Screen Shot 2018-02-17 at 11.51.46 AM

I went online and looked for some other diagrams. My favorite was this poster, available from Etsy, by artist Rachel Ignotofsky. It reminded me of another resource I saw in school and loved: the movie Hemo the Magnificent, directed by Frank Capra. Beethoven's Eroica opens that 1957 movie, and Hemo, representing blood, talks and has a face. Smiling faces and all, the poster still has too much information for my class, but this is background information, the point being to make myself feel less anxious about the material, and it accomplished that.

Lub Dub goes the Heart by Rachel Ignotofsky https://www.etsy.com/listing/177478811/lub-dub-goes-the-heart-anatomy-poster
Lub Dub goes the Heart by Rachel Ignotofsky

Finally, I read the lesson plan slowly and just sat with it, and my feelings, for a while. I put on some relaxing music and listened while I was reading and sitting. As I listened, read, and sat, I told myself it was okay to be anxious. Wouldn't that be normal for leading a complicated lesson for the first time at a new school? Wouldn't that be expected, given my history with dissection? Wouldn't that help me be more empathetic with any students who had misgivings?

I can do this.

The class didn't go perfectly. Some kids were indeed bothered by the smell and put their sweatshirts over their noses and mouths to block it out. Most of them also didn't remember the difference between the aorta, the pulmonary trunk, and the superior vena cava. At least one student said "this is awesome," though. And a parent I saw as I was leaving called out to me, "my daughter loved that heart thing you guys did today!" I even had fun myself; I watched and observed all the different approaches the students brought to the activity, I marveled that you could stick your finger all the way through the aorta into the left ventricle and feel its elasticity and see its thick muscular wall. I felt my own heart steadily beating.


IMG_2540On the way home I drove a little ways to find my geocache for the day in a birdhouse. I had the Telemann viola concerto playing on the car's sound system, as I do every day now. The day was warm, sunny, even though the winter sun was low in the sky, and I was struck again by how beautiful and joyful the piece is in its simplicity.

I'm still in that phase where I'm trying to get it all together technically. I'm memorizing it, I'm cleaning up the intonation, I'm using the metronome, I'm getting used to the Baroque bow, I'm fiddling with the bowings. I'm recording it every day and posting these recordings to the 100 Day practice challenge on Facebook. I'm trying to keep the weird faces and swaying to a minimum. The time will come, though, when all this will be a prelude to the main event. The time will come when I will have to play from the heart.

I can do this.

Replies

February 23, 2018 at 10:30 PM · thanks so much for this...especially the part about wearing fingerless gloves when you're nervous...i'm going to go put mine on right now! :)

February 25, 2018 at 07:12 AM · That was something my teacher told me to do when I had a big solo a few years ago, and it really helped!

This article has been archived and is no longer accepting comments.

Facebook Twitter YouTube Instagram Email

Violinist.com is made possible by...

Shar Music
Shar Music

Pirastro Strings
Pirastro Strings

Metzler Violin Shop
Metzler Violin Shop

Yamaha YEV Series Violin
Yamaha YEV Series Violin

Dimitri Musafia
Dimitri Musafia, Master Maker of Violin and Viola Cases

Gliga Violins
Gliga Violins

Corilon Violins

Bay Fine Strings Violin Shop

Bobelock Cases

Fiddlerman.com

Fiddlershop

Nazareth Gevorkian Violins

Los Angeles Violin Shop

Pluhar Violins

Pro-Am Strings Ltd

Violin Lab

Violin Pros

Wangbow Violin Bow Workshop

Subscribe