Printer-friendly version
Patricia Baser

In the Field

September 20, 2009 at 1:32 PM

Yesterday, I played an outside wedding.  The setting was a farm field, and the nuptials were in front of an oak tree that was a few hundred years old.  Idyllic and all that, except for the about 6 inches of rain we've had since Thursday.  The bride had a backup location, but wouldn't use it.  Our string trio was able to play most of the prelude in the open air, but then the rain started again, so we had to retreat to the small tent (originally there to hid the bride, etc.) for the remainder.  Just before the wedding, the father of the bride tried to kick us out of the tent (he was just a little stressed), but a bridesmaid intervened on orders from the bride.  Everyone could hear us, but we had a hard time hearing anything, as the bride's limo was idling by our tent.   A special highlight of this event was accompanying the singer, who stayed up near the front (about 30 feet away from us) to sing by a microphone.  We could not hear her at all, so could only follow by watching her mouth.    Just glad to have my ouside violin and hope there aren't any ants in my case. 


From Pauline Lerner
Posted on September 21, 2009 at 2:19 AM

Strange things can happen at gigs.  The ceilidh band I was in was playing outdoors, and a very strong wind came up.  At first it blew our sheet music away.  Then it blew our music stands over.  We did a lot of faking just to get through the event.

I once had a gig like yours, except that everything went well.  It was a commitment ceremony for two women.  They were "partnered" under a big, old, oak tree on a beautiful, landscaped preserve.  I played before and during the ceremony, and a small rock band played later.  I asked them to help me do a sound check, and I'm glad I did.  They could not hear me at all at the site of the ceremony.  They set up their their audio equipment for me to use and took care of me.  I stood at an opening of the tent where I could see the ceremony and also be plugged into their audio equipment.  It all went well, and I had a great time.


From SAM MIHAILOFF
Posted on September 21, 2009 at 7:32 AM

One cannot pre-plan Mother Nature


From Emily Grossman
Posted on September 21, 2009 at 7:39 AM

Aahahahaa!  I love weddings.  So perfect and ideal in the mind of the bride, until it all plays out and Reality checks in.  It's just like marriage, actually. 


From LUIS CLAUDIO MANFIO
Posted on September 21, 2009 at 10:51 AM

It's allways good having a second instrument for such cases in order to preserve your best one.

www.manfio.com


From Rosalind Porter
Posted on September 21, 2009 at 8:30 PM

I was actually a bit disappointed by this gig report as I was SURE from the first paragraph that we were going to have cows or cattle taking part at some point in the wedding gig!   

I remember going to a wedding as a guest, out in the beautiful local countryside and the bride's parents had set up a gorgeous huge marquee, but the only way to get from the car-park to the marquee turned out to be over a grass field covered with large, fresh, cow-pats... and it was getting dark by the time the reception started...  Champagne doesn't taste the same mingled with the smell of cow (both ends...)   Weddings seem to make people lose all common sense!


From Aaron Schiff
Posted on September 23, 2009 at 2:33 AM

Now this was a situation for a carbon fiber violin.  I was at a wedding Sunday afternoon and it had been raining all weekend.  About a half an hour before the ceremony started the rain stopped and we had gorgeous sunset through the clouds over the Colorado National Monument for a backdrop.  Some do work out. 

This entry has been archived and is no longer accepting comments.

Our Kokopelli
Please support Violinist.com
through your
one-time donation or
sponsorship campaign.

Violinist.com is made possible by...

Shar Music

Yamaha V3 Series Violin

The Potter Violin Company

Coregami Performal

Metzler Violin Shop

Gliga Violins

Zhuhai International Mozart Competition - Apply by April 30, 2017

Connolly Music

Corilon Violins

Meadowmount School of Music

Anderson Musical Instrument Insurance

Dimitri Musafia, Master Maker of Violin and Viola Cases

Fiddlerman.com

Fiddlershop

Heifetz International Music Institute

Long Island Violin Shop

Nazareth Gevorkian Violins

Pro-Am Strings

Wangbow Violin Bow Workshop