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Mara Gerety

Goodbye Slava

April 27, 2007 at 2:21 PM

I've just seen on the news that Mstislav Rostropovich died last night. I have absolutely no idea what else to say.
From Armand All├ęgre
Posted on April 27, 2007 at 2:30 PM
This is indeed tragic...I'll never forget listening to his recordings as a kid.
Such an amazing cellist, conductor, musician, and person.
From anisha netto
Posted on April 27, 2007 at 3:14 PM
oh,my God!!I am SHOCKED.What a musician....it doesn't seem to sink in..
A
From Igor Pikayzen
Posted on April 27, 2007 at 3:46 PM
The last of the greats of the 20th century; an absolutely irreplaceable loss. Our last connection to Shostakovich, Prokofiev, Oistrakh, Richter, Gilels...I believe that with Rostropovich we are burying the whole golden age of classical music. Rest in Peace Mstislav Leopoldovich; we will always cherish what you have given us.
From Karin Lin
Posted on April 27, 2007 at 4:15 PM
I heard that on the radio this morning as well. I didn't even know before that he was such an important political figure...I just loved him as a musician. He will be missed.
From Terez Mertes
Posted on April 27, 2007 at 4:19 PM
Ditto everything Karin said.

Sad news.

: (

From Mischa S.
Posted on April 27, 2007 at 4:28 PM
He seemed to be the last one of the real greatest, knowing Hindemith, Heifetz, Sibelius, giving at least more than 200 pieces first performances as cellist or conductor...

Finally he was one of the very few classical musicians, who took a stand on social or political problems. True - easy to say for me, I'm not in the position of a classical superstar with contracts, image etc., but if someone like him dies, it becomes painfully obvious, how less musicians engage and how important this engagement really is. "Singing a song means expressing an opinion" (Th. Quasthoff). The New York Times wrote a good orbituary for him. May you rest in peace, Mstislav Leopoldovitch!

From Eugene Chan
Posted on April 27, 2007 at 5:30 PM
Just heard the news minutes ago. We all knew it was coming, but still, words cannot express the shock I feel right now.
From Tom Holzman
Posted on April 27, 2007 at 8:10 PM
It is indeed very sad, but he lived a long and very rich and productive life. The world is a much better place for his having passed through it.

To me, it is much sadder when someone that good leaves the scene much to early, e.g., Feuermann, Neveu, or Rabin. I can still remember my father telling me how abolsutely devastated he was when, as a soldier overseas during WWII, he learned of the death of Feuermann, who he abolsutely worshipped.

From Jo D
Posted on April 28, 2007 at 6:50 AM
A few months ago I heard from fellow musicians that Slava was rather ill and the situation was grave. Now the world has lost a great human being and musical icon. I was fortunate to hear him live at his 75th birthday concert. He did a Bach solo for encore; and I saw the entire human history in front of me with his playing. It's the most moving performance I have heard, and it changed my life. I salute you, Slava.

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