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Emily Grossman

Twilight Waltz, by Johnny Gimble

September 6, 2007 at 6:30 AM

Check out track #4

My favorite part was the little mandolin strum right in the pause. Great little fiddle tune. Oh, and the Black and White Rag on this cd is just great, too.

Thanks, mom and dad, for finding this for me. I knew you'd remember it!

That recording I fussed about is now happily in the original blog entry, if anyone still wants to hear my own rendition. It's pretty close.

From Jim W. Miller
Posted on September 6, 2007 at 10:15 AM
Learn the fiddle solo to this, and we can work it up.
From Jim W. Miller
Posted on September 6, 2007 at 2:53 PM
Does Twilight Waltz remind you a little of Bartok concerto #2 on thorazine? The mandolin strum you mentioned would be the harp.
From Albert Justice
Posted on September 6, 2007 at 5:17 PM
Very nice... Well balanced and pleasing without being too dry.
From Jim W. Miller
Posted on September 7, 2007 at 4:10 AM
Light-bodied with aroma of berries and a finish of prunes, listen now through 2008?
From Emily Grossman
Posted on September 7, 2007 at 6:03 AM
Plummy veneer with a velvety nose!
From Emily Grossman
Posted on September 7, 2007 at 6:04 AM
Jim, I haven't heard Bartok #2 yet. I'll have to check and see.
From Jim W. Miller
Posted on September 8, 2007 at 12:20 AM
I just now discovered this CD with old time fiddling.

http://oldhatrecords.com/cd1005.html#songs

I might have to buy it if only to find out what the rest of #6 sounds like.

From Gabriel Kastelle
Posted on September 8, 2007 at 5:54 PM
I kind of like the earlier entry solo violin better-- soulful violin, I should say, perhaps. Good sound-- deep fiddle. :-)
From Gabriel Kastelle
Posted on September 8, 2007 at 5:56 PM
Jim, saw the Old Hat reference, and must blurt. They've got some great stuff out. I never tire of Old Hat CD-1002: "Violin, Sing the Blues for Me", a collection of recordings by African-American fiddlers, 1926-1949, in everything from duos with guitar to large jug bands, with jugs for real. Great fun.
From Jim W. Miller
Posted on September 8, 2007 at 6:29 PM
You know, appreciating the beauty of this stuff requires that you go much deeper than the superficial. The sample of #6 is one of the most captivating things I've heard in a while. The wierd rhythm or tempo thing at the start, and wondering whatever made that guy think he could sing, and if he likes it. Did he love this, or was it some kind of practical best option for him. Just makes for me, say some student's Brahms sonata, seem so superficial. Even a pro version maybe, if there's no real story to it.
From Jim W. Miller
Posted on September 8, 2007 at 6:41 PM
In other words, what was his entire concept? You know pretty much what someone's concept of Brahms is, after you've experienced a few violins lessons. This is deep stuff, and not always as pretty as a cheerleader.

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