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Rachel Barton Pine

Rachel's Musical Adventures: Live on the Internet 3 times

November 15, 2007 at 8:46 AM

Live on the Internet - 3 times

This week, I will be giving interviews on rock and classical radio stations in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Both of these stations stream live on the internet, so you can listen too!

Thursday, November 15, 8:30am Mountain Time (9:30am Central, 10:30am Eastern)
94 Rock – listen online at www.94rock.com/pages/listenlive.html.
This will be an interview on the morning show with TJ Trout, and will probably include a live performance.

Thursday, November 15, 12:30pm Mountain Time (1:30pm Central, 2:30pm Eastern)
Classical KHFM – listen online at www.classicalkhfm.com – click on the “On The Air” button on the top of the left-hand sidebar.
This will be an interview with host Bonnie Renfro.

Saturday, November 17, 8:30am Mountain Time (9:30am Central, 10:30am Eastern)
Classical KHFM – listen online at www.classicalkhfm.com – click on the “On The Air” button on the top of the left-hand sidebar.
This will be a special interview for the “Classics for Kids” program with host Bob Bishop.



New YouTube video

“Trio Settecento performs Leclair’s Sonata No. 12”

Trio Settecento (Rachel Barton Pine, baroque violin, John Mark Rozendaal, viola da gamba, David Schrader, harpsichord) performs the first and second movements (Adagio and Allegro ma non troppo) of Leclair's Sonata in G Major, Op. 5 No. 12, at the Boston Early Music Festival, June 15, 2007. Rachel Barton Pine introduces the piece.

To watch all of my YouTube videos, please visit www.youtube.com/RachelBartonPine.



FEATURE STORY

The Albuquerque Journal (New Mexico)
November 11, 2007
“Violinist's Global Life Goes Beyond Playing”
By David Steinberg

Violinist Rachel Barton Pine seems to be redefining what it means to be a touring concert artist.

Like many classical musicians, Pine crisscrosses the world.

But she does more than give concerts and master classes in quickie visits. Pine spent a week at the end of September in Singapore, where, among other things, she gave a private recital for the president of the island-nation and the next day gave a public concert.

During two weeks in mid-October, Pine was in Israel giving recitals at chamber music societies and at a kibbutz and then several concerts in Tel Aviv with the Israel Chamber Orchestra.

Back in August, before Pine performed in Gottingen, Germany and Santa Fe, she was in the West African country of Ghana for 10 days. The purpose of her stay there was to attend the International Consortium for Music of Africa and Its Dispora. Pine was representing her foundation.

"My foundation has a new program called Global Heartstrings to support classical music in developing countries," Pine said in a phone interview from her office in Chicago.

"We gather supplies, collecting shoulder bars, rosins, etc ... We're helping groups in India and Haiti with what they need, any developing country where people want to play classical music."

In Ghana, she worked with some of the country's youth who are learning to play stringed instruments. Pine also performed with the national symphony and played for Ghana's president.

"The people in the symphony are just regular folks playing classical music because they love it so much. I was there encouraging them," she said.

Pine returns to the Land of Enchantment next weekend to perform in three concerts with the New Mexico Symphony Orchestra.

She will play Camille Saint-Saens' Violin Concerto No. 3.

The concerto relates to her CD "American Virtuosa: Tribute to Maud Powell" on the Cedille label. It debuted on the Billboard charts at No. 12 in July. The album has many of the pieces that Powell, one of the top concert violinists of her time, performed as a touring artist in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

The Saint-Saens work isn't on the CD, but Pine said Powell had performed it with John Philip Sousa's band.

Sousa, known for his marches, always had a soprano and a violinist on his concert programs, Pine said. He tried to come as close as he could to what we know today as a symphony orchestra.

"He always included cutting-edge classical music," she said.

Pine recorded the CD to recognize Powell because she was a virtuoso and is an obscure figure to today's audiences. Powell was the first American musician who wrote her own program notes for her repertoire and one of the first to do outreach.

"She'd find a small town on a day off and probably give the town's first ever classical concert. She'd talk to the audience from the stage about what she was performing," Pine said.

"We think of some of these things as innovations. In fact, they were thought of 100 years ago."

Pine enjoys giving pre-concert talks because she thinks it helps connect the audience to the music and to the artist. Making connections to her audience— and to potential audiences— is one of her longtime priorities. Pine has her own blog, podcasts and her own channel on YouTube.com. She also plays her violin on rock music stations when she tours.

"There are all different ways to reach out to people. I'm sure if Maud Powell were alive today she'd be doing all of that," she said.

Also on the NMSO program are Sir William Walton's oratorio Belshazzar's Feast, which is based on the Book of Daniel and Psalms 81 and 137 and Felix Mendelssohn's Hebrides Overture, also known as Fingal's Cave.



REVIEW: My concert in Greenville last week

The Greenville News (South Carolina)
November 11, 2007
“GSO’s ‘Red Violin’ program an astonishing evening of music”
By Ann Hicks

The Greenville Symphony Orchestra’s Saturday night Masterworks concert, “The Red Violin,” proved to be one unforgettable soundscape painted with brilliant detail by soloist, conductor and musicians.

American violin virtuosa Rachel Barton Pine opened the program with dazzling solo performances of two different works and an encore to remember.

Her performance was propulsive – filled with passion fueled with jaw-dropping technical salvo as she bowed overtime on her 1742 Guarnerius del Gesu “ex-Soldat.”

Her 16-minute performance of the “Chaconne” from John Coriglione’s Italianate score written for Francois Girard’s 1998 movie “The Red Violin” was a revelation. Pine explored and mined the works’ virtuosic etudes until it sent shivers up the spine.

Her sexy, unbridled romp through Pablo de Sarasate’s “Fantasy on Bizet’s Carmen” had the audience going berserk – whistling, yelling, applauding – after she all but materialized the alluring gypsy woman in the torrid “Seguidilla” and the fiery “Habanera.”

Maestro Edvard Tchivzhell and the musicians proved to be well-matched partners to Pine.

After repeated callbacks by the delighted audience, the young virtuosa encored with her version of “Happy Birthday” to celebrate the GSO’s 60th anniversary, she said. It is darn near impossible to describe what all Pine did to that tune. Suffice to say it proved to be an experience of a lifetime as she simultaneously bowed and plucked the del Gesu and sent her fingers running from one end of the soundboard to the other. It was awesome stuff.

From al ku
Posted on November 15, 2007 at 1:49 PM
it is refreshing to see ms pine engaging the audience and sharing her thoughts. who in the audience won't be melted? her playing and her personality make her a great ambassador of the violin, especially at a time when many classical musicians only feel comfortable letting their playing does the talking. her clips are truly enjoyable and inspirational. bravo!
From Antonello Lofù
Posted on November 15, 2007 at 2:31 PM
BravA!
From Mayra Calvani
Posted on November 15, 2007 at 7:14 PM
Major congratulations, Rachel! I hope to see you perform live when you visit Brussels, Belgium.

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