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Fiddler or Violinist? Like being both!

December 10, 2012 at 8:07 PM

Although classically trained, and instilled with a love particularly of the Baroque, I do like to cross over and use my violin as a fiddle! Here's a playlist of some of my favourite Folk Fiddle Tunes!

KirbyFiddler's Fiddle Tunes!

I like a bit of melody and rhythmic interest, a tune needs to have something special about it, there are hundreds of Irish tunes, for example, I hear and try to play which don't quite connect in my head, but occasionally something clicks! Although my main focus has been on music of the UK and Ireland I am open to discovery, American bluegrass or old tyme throws up some pleasant moments.

Variety!

Here's another playlist you might like to have on in the background over the Christmas Holidays,

Not really anything to do with Violin or Fiddles, but more music from the folk side of my split personality!

The Exmoor Carolers!



From David Sanderson
Posted on December 12, 2012 at 2:30 PM
I wonder if this range of interests is not more common than most people realize. I claim that if one wishes to learn rhythm fiddle tunes are ideal, because they require one to carry both the melody and the rnythm, for dancers.

Secondly, traditional music developed without the set of rules that define Classical playing; consequently players were free to find possibilities as they wished, freedom from constraints that led to some wonderful results. Youtube browsing is recommended.

From Parker Duchemin
Posted on December 13, 2012 at 1:37 PM
A great set of tunes and beautifully played -- thanks for this treat. I too am one of those classically trained violinists who now plays a lot of fiddle music, sometimes to the puzzlement of my classical-only friends. I grew up in a part of Canada with a rich Scottish fiddling tradition that was too often scorned by musical snobs, but I fell in love with it as a young man at country dances, in my pursuit of certain local girls. Unfortunately I only began to learn how to play the tunes in mid-life, alas. Fortunately that classical snobbery seems to be vanishing now in my part of the world, through the efforts of contemporary fiddlers like Cape Breton's marvellous Natalie MacMaster. Some of this music is as complex and challenging as a Bach partita --check out this youtube of Natalie playing Tulluchgorum --http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sdc-oL6VjIc
From Parker Duchemin
Posted on December 13, 2012 at 2:07 PM
Another thought just occurred to me, Rupert -- this topic might provide the basis for an interesting discussion if you submitted it as a question in that section of Violinist.com. The discussion topics don't seem to disappear from view quite so fast and often generate more debate.
From Charlie Gibbs
Posted on December 13, 2012 at 7:37 PM
I fiddle in another genre: bluegrass. I was playing bluegrass mandolin when a friend gave me a cheap violin, and I eventually got seduced by classical music. I still go to my regular bluegrass jams, but now as a fiddler. We'll sometimes do things like St. Anne's Reel, but most of our stuff comes from the blue ridge mountains of Tennessee rather than the hills of Scotland.
From Parker Duchemin
Posted on December 13, 2012 at 9:38 PM
Love that Bluegrass sound too. Great stuff! Will probably give it a try before long. I really enjoy learning to play in different musical genres. Anytime gimme Mozart, gimme Bluegrass, gimme Bach, Scott Skinner, Vivaldi, Neil Gow, William Marshall, Turlough O'Carolan, and lots more . . .
From Francesca Rizzardi
Posted on December 14, 2012 at 7:07 AM
I am involved with both Scottish fiddle and Klezmer.
I'm happy with whatever beautiful music I can play on my violin, but these two genres have been more accessible to me for ensemble playing. It's more fun to play with people than to play alone! But I haven't mastered the idioms of either genre yet.

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Rupert Kirby is from Lynton, North Devon, United Kingdom. Biography

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