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a new beginning

Kelsey Zachary

Written by
Published: February 12, 2015 at 3:21 AM [UTC]

How does one start a blog? Just coming up with a title is challenging and I'm not even sure I like the one that I have come up with. Oh well... Maybe you'll be lucky and I will come up with something insightful or intriguing to keep your attention.

Here's a quick introduction of me to help get this off to a more amicable beginning. I (Kelsey), am a violinist, violist, pianist and composer and all around music nut. I've wanted to be a professional musician since I was 7 and by the age of 9 I could tell you the names of the teachers I wanted to study with and which schools they taught at along with the audition requirements.

I was lucky and despite some challenges along the way, I made it into music school and eventually got paired up with the teacher I wanted to study with. Soon after my post-secondary adventures began, life decided to throw me a curve ball. As I'm sure anyone who has been through music school can tell you, surviving music school and coming out on the other side still wanting to play is a challenge in itself. You are tested and pushed in so many ways to be sure it's really what you want to do.

I began developing severe symptoms which would later be attributed to fibromyalgia. Numb hands, loss of balance, insomnia, muscle and joint pain to name a few of the things I had to figure out how to deal with during school. It ended up having a huge impact on my education as well as other areas of my life. Just as I was beginning to adjust to life with fibromyalgia and was finding a combination of diet, meds, exercise etc that enabled me to do most of the things I enjoyed, things got crazy again. Nerve pain. It's the most excruciating pain to experience and in my case, it's all in my head....the nerves that is, I'm not imagining things. Imagine having someone taking an icepick and shoving it into the side of your head and then cutting across the side of your face to your nose, to your chin and to your eye, and then starting the same process over and over again. That is one of the ways I can describe the pain that trigeminal neuralgia produces. The debilitating pain can be triggered by eating, talking, bright light, a gentle breeze, brushing my teeth and so many other things. You never just when it's going to strike and you spend much of your time fearing it's attacks. Without going into more detail... it sucks. A lot.

Now, I'm not just a "diseased" individual, but I've had and continue to have my challenges. Through it all, I've tried my best to keep my head high and to enjoy the things I love most as well as to develop other hobbies that I can enjoy if my body is giving me a rough time.

So....after that kind of long little blurb about me, here's some of the things you might expect to see/read about here should you continue to visit my blog! You can expect to enjoy musings on photography (and see some pictures), baking/cooking, knitting, music, chronic pain, being a musician with a chronic disease, hiking and all manner of other things!

Welcome to the blog and I look forward to writing more soon!

Cheers,
Kelsey


From Stephen Brivati
Posted on February 12, 2015 at 6:17 AM
Greetings,
welcome back Kelsey. I followed your blogs avidly all those years ago when you were just a talented young thing doing so much, being recognized as so talented by people all over the place.
Then that axe fell out of nowhere and it sort of fell on us as well. We lost something precious on this site.
It's quite common to say stuff like 'well it happens for a reason,'. I suppose you must have had that one a few times? Whether it's annoying, encouraging or just plain uninteresting when your head is exploding I have no idea. People say it for different reasons ranging from honestly believing it to be true to simply not having a clue what else to say.
Personally I do believe that there is a divine purpose behind these things but one can have a real crappy time finding out what it is.
But at the end of the day you are still Kelsey and having you back is a great day all round.
Cheers,
Burp
From Laurie Niles
Posted on February 12, 2015 at 6:26 AM
Hi Kelsey! So good to see a blog from you! I'm so sorry you have had to suffer from fibromyalgia, it sounds so painful and disconcerting. I'm looking forward to hearing about your new adventures! One of these days I'd love to get back to Vancouver, too!
From Terry Hsu
Posted on February 12, 2015 at 9:56 AM
no, I really don't get paid to say this. But try this for joint pains. It's helped me.

http://www.reliefmart.com/TherapainPlus.htm

From Paul Deck
Posted on February 12, 2015 at 12:45 PM
Your courage inspires me.

Great photos. The snail made me smile.

From Yixi Zhang
Posted on February 13, 2015 at 11:35 PM
Good to see you here again Kal! I told you before and I'm saying this again, you reminds me of Beethoven. Those of us can transcend our circumstances are more than being heroic. As great Stoics said, it's not what happens to us but how we handle them that matters. You've shown what we are made of as human beings and what true freedom means. Brava!

I know the battle is on-going for you, but each time I saw your posting on FB, you made me smile. Thank you for being such a shining light!

From Dottie Case
Posted on February 14, 2015 at 4:24 AM
Welcome back. Your journey looks quite a lot like one that my daughter has been on, as a young active musician struck down while in school, with chronic illness. Like you, she has had to adjust to what she can do, and redefine. It's tragic in some ways, and then again, like you say here, not terminal, so perhaps not so tragic in the end. But challenging.... and very disconcerting, to have the foundational 'thing' yanked away.

Blessings on your and your health. May you find ways to be authentic within your given parameters.

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